Sensory processing, cardiovascular reactivity, and the type a coronary-prone behavior pattern

Eric L. Diamond, Charles S Carver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the hypothesis that two modes of sensory processing known to elicit integrated patterns of cardiovascular reactivity will arouse exaggerated responses in Type A coronary-prone individuals. 15 Type A and 10 Type B male college students performed on two tasks calling for sensory intake and sensory rejection, respectively, while being monitored for heart rate, blood pressure, and vasomotor response. Contrary to prediction, the tasks failed to differentiate the groups, although each task appeared to elicit the expected pattern of cardio-vascular response across groups. It is suggested that sensory processing tasks per se may be insufficiently challenging to elicit the characteristic hyperresponsivity of the Type A.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-275
Number of pages11
JournalBiological Psychology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980

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Blood Vessels
Heart Rate
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Blood Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Sensory processing, cardiovascular reactivity, and the type a coronary-prone behavior pattern. / Diamond, Eric L.; Carver, Charles S.

In: Biological Psychology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.01.1980, p. 265-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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