Semantic interference deficits and the detection of mild Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment without dementia

David Loewenstein, Amarilis Acevedo, Cheryl Luis, Thomas Crum, Warren W. Barker, Ranjan Duara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Impairment in delayed recall has traditionally been considered a hallmark feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, vulnerability to semantic interference may reflect early manifestations of the disorder. In this study, 26 mildly demented AD patients (mild AD), 53 patients with mild cognitive impairment without dementia (MCI), and 53 normal community-dwelling elders were first presented 10 common objects that were recalled over 3 learning trials. Subjects were then presented 10 new semantically related objects followed by recall for the original targets. After controlling for the degree of overall memory impairment, mild AD patients demonstrated greater proactive but equivalent retroactive interference relative to MCI patients. Normal elderly subjects exhibited the least amount of proactive and retroactive interference effects. Recall for targets susceptible to proactive interference correctly classified 81.3% of MCI patients and 81.3% of normal elderly subjects, outperforming measures of delayed recall and rate of forgetting. Adding recognition memory scores to the model enhanced both sensitivity (84.6%) and specificity (88.5%). A combination of proactive and retroactive interference measures yielded sensitivity of 84.6% and specificity of 96.2% in differentiating mild AD patients from normal older adults. Susceptibility to proactive semantic interference may be an early cognitive feature of MCI and AD patients presenting for clinical evaluation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-100
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Semantics
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Independent Living
Cognitive Dysfunction
Sensitivity and Specificity
Learning

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Memory
  • Proactive interference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Semantic interference deficits and the detection of mild Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment without dementia. / Loewenstein, David; Acevedo, Amarilis; Luis, Cheryl; Crum, Thomas; Barker, Warren W.; Duara, Ranjan.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 91-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Loewenstein, David ; Acevedo, Amarilis ; Luis, Cheryl ; Crum, Thomas ; Barker, Warren W. ; Duara, Ranjan. / Semantic interference deficits and the detection of mild Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment without dementia. In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. 2004 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 91-100.
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