Self-perceived knowledge of the O.J. Simpson trial: Third-person perception and perceptions of guilt

Paul D. Driscoll, Michael B. Salwen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tested the "third-person effect" during the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial. The perceptual component of the third-person effect predicts that people judge themselves to be less susceptible to media influence than other people. Findings from a nationwide telephone survey indicated that respondents' self-perceived knowledge about the legal issues involved in the Simpson trial was correlated with third-person perception of a perceived "neutral" media message. Self-perceived knowledge was not correlated with third-person perceptual bias of a perceived "biased" message. It was suggested that the biased message primed respondents' perceptions of Simpson's guilt or innocence. The relative contributions of various predictors of third-person perception were assessed using regression analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-556
Number of pages16
JournalJournalism and Mass Communication Quaterly
Volume74
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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