Self-organized segregation within an evolving population

Neil F Johnson, P. M. Hui, R. Jonson, T. S. Lo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

156 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An evolving population, in which individual members ("agents") adapt their behavior according to past experience, is of central importance to many disciplines. Because of their limited knowledge and capabilities, agents are forced to make decisions based on inductive, rather than deductive, thinking. We show that a population of competing agents with similar capabilities and knowledge will tend to self-segregate into opposing groups characterized by extreme behavior. Cautious agents perform poorly and tend to become rare.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3360-3363
Number of pages4
JournalPhysical Review Letters
Volume82
Issue number16
StatePublished - Apr 19 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Johnson, N. F., Hui, P. M., Jonson, R., & Lo, T. S. (1999). Self-organized segregation within an evolving population. Physical Review Letters, 82(16), 3360-3363.

Self-organized segregation within an evolving population. / Johnson, Neil F; Hui, P. M.; Jonson, R.; Lo, T. S.

In: Physical Review Letters, Vol. 82, No. 16, 19.04.1999, p. 3360-3363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, NF, Hui, PM, Jonson, R & Lo, TS 1999, 'Self-organized segregation within an evolving population', Physical Review Letters, vol. 82, no. 16, pp. 3360-3363.
Johnson NF, Hui PM, Jonson R, Lo TS. Self-organized segregation within an evolving population. Physical Review Letters. 1999 Apr 19;82(16):3360-3363.
Johnson, Neil F ; Hui, P. M. ; Jonson, R. ; Lo, T. S. / Self-organized segregation within an evolving population. In: Physical Review Letters. 1999 ; Vol. 82, No. 16. pp. 3360-3363.
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