Self-focused attention and the placebo effect

Fooling some of the people some of the time

Frederick X. Gibbons, Charles S Carver, Michael F. Scheier, Stefan E. Hormuth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An experiment tested the hypothesis that mirror-induced self-awareness would minimize a "placebo" effect. Some subjects were led to believe that a drug that they were about to ingest would produce arousal symptoms as a side effect. Self-aware subjects in this condition subsequently reported experiencing less arousal from the placebo, and fewer of the side effects ascribed to it, than did less self-aware subjects. Discussion centered on the implications of these findings for placebo research and implications for two common alternative interpretations of self-awareness effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-274
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979

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Placebo Effect
Arousal
Placebos
self awareness
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations
drug
interpretation
time
experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Self-focused attention and the placebo effect : Fooling some of the people some of the time. / Gibbons, Frederick X.; Carver, Charles S; Scheier, Michael F.; Hormuth, Stefan E.

In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.01.1979, p. 263-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gibbons, Frederick X. ; Carver, Charles S ; Scheier, Michael F. ; Hormuth, Stefan E. / Self-focused attention and the placebo effect : Fooling some of the people some of the time. In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. 1979 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 263-274.
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