Self-esteem, adverse life events, and mental health diagnoses among Black women living with HIV

Sherene Samuels, Sannisha K. Dale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Black women in the U.S. are disproportionately impacted by HIV and adverse life events (ALE). High self-esteem has been noted as a protective factor and low self-esteem has been linked to mental health diagnoses. However, the existing literature is limited in the examination of how self-esteem may buffer relationships between ALE and mental health diagnoses among Black women living with HIV (BWLWH). Methods: One hundred and nineteen BWLWH completed self-report measures on self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale) and ALE (Life Events Checklist for DSM-5) (e.g. sexual assault, physical assault, accidents, natural disaster) as well as a clinical interview (via Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Inventory) to diagnose current depression, PTSD, and suicidality. Results: Multivariable logistic regressions indicated that higher self-esteem was associated with lower likelihood of current depression (OR =.894, p <.01), PTSD (OR =.838, p <.001) and suicidality (OR =.889, p <.05). Interactions between self-esteem and total ALE significantly predicted current depression (OR =.000003, p <.05) and PTSD (OR = 2.7182 × 10−9, p <.001); and higher total ALE related to higher likelihood of current PTSD only among BWLWH reporting lower self-esteem (OR = 1.21, p <.05). Conclusion: Interventions addressing mental health diagnoses among BWLWH should incorporate strategies to enhance self-esteem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEthnicity and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Black women
  • HIV
  • adverse life events
  • mental health
  • self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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