Selective molecular assembly patterning

A new approach to micro- and nanochemical patterning of surfaces for biological applications

Roger Michel, Jost W. Lussi, Gabor Csucs, Ilya Reviakine, Gaudenz Danuser, Brigitte Ketterer, Jeffrey A. Hubbell, Marcus Textor, Nicholas D. Spencer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

152 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A novel patterning technique based on selective self-assembly of alkane phosphates on metal oxide surfaces is presented. Standard photolithography was used to create patterns of titanium dioxide within a matrix of silicon dioxide. Alkane phosphates were found to self-assemble on TiO2, but not on SiO2, surfaces. Subsequent adsorption of poly(L-lysine)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) rendered the exposed SiO2 surface resistant to protein adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry were employed to monitor the assembly processes. Protein-adsorption studies by means of fluorescence microscopy conclusively established that the resulting surfaces displayed protein-adhesive, alkyl phosphate modified TiO2 features, arranged within a protein-resistant PLL-g-PEG-modified SiO2 matrix. Human foreskin fibroblasts, incubated in a serum-containing medium, were found to selectively attach to the protein-adhesive areas, where they developed focal contacts. No interaction of cells with the PLL-g-PEG-coated SiO2 areas was evident for at least 14 days. This patterning approach, termed selective molecular assembly patterning, is considered to be suitable for reproducible and cost-effective fabrication of biologically relevant chemical patterns over large areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3281-3287
Number of pages7
JournalLangmuir
Volume18
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 16 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

assembly
lysine
Polyethylene glycols
Lysine
proteins
Proteins
Alkanes
Phosphates
glycols
phosphates
Adsorption
ethylene
Adhesives
Paraffins
adhesives
alkanes
adsorption
Fluorescence microscopy
Photolithography
Fibroblasts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Michel, R., Lussi, J. W., Csucs, G., Reviakine, I., Danuser, G., Ketterer, B., ... Spencer, N. D. (2002). Selective molecular assembly patterning: A new approach to micro- and nanochemical patterning of surfaces for biological applications. Langmuir, 18(8), 3281-3287. https://doi.org/10.1021/la011715y

Selective molecular assembly patterning : A new approach to micro- and nanochemical patterning of surfaces for biological applications. / Michel, Roger; Lussi, Jost W.; Csucs, Gabor; Reviakine, Ilya; Danuser, Gaudenz; Ketterer, Brigitte; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Textor, Marcus; Spencer, Nicholas D.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 18, No. 8, 16.04.2002, p. 3281-3287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Michel, R, Lussi, JW, Csucs, G, Reviakine, I, Danuser, G, Ketterer, B, Hubbell, JA, Textor, M & Spencer, ND 2002, 'Selective molecular assembly patterning: A new approach to micro- and nanochemical patterning of surfaces for biological applications', Langmuir, vol. 18, no. 8, pp. 3281-3287. https://doi.org/10.1021/la011715y
Michel, Roger ; Lussi, Jost W. ; Csucs, Gabor ; Reviakine, Ilya ; Danuser, Gaudenz ; Ketterer, Brigitte ; Hubbell, Jeffrey A. ; Textor, Marcus ; Spencer, Nicholas D. / Selective molecular assembly patterning : A new approach to micro- and nanochemical patterning of surfaces for biological applications. In: Langmuir. 2002 ; Vol. 18, No. 8. pp. 3281-3287.
@article{26e100d89c624c899442aebc4ee6867a,
title = "Selective molecular assembly patterning: A new approach to micro- and nanochemical patterning of surfaces for biological applications",
abstract = "A novel patterning technique based on selective self-assembly of alkane phosphates on metal oxide surfaces is presented. Standard photolithography was used to create patterns of titanium dioxide within a matrix of silicon dioxide. Alkane phosphates were found to self-assemble on TiO2, but not on SiO2, surfaces. Subsequent adsorption of poly(L-lysine)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) rendered the exposed SiO2 surface resistant to protein adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry were employed to monitor the assembly processes. Protein-adsorption studies by means of fluorescence microscopy conclusively established that the resulting surfaces displayed protein-adhesive, alkyl phosphate modified TiO2 features, arranged within a protein-resistant PLL-g-PEG-modified SiO2 matrix. Human foreskin fibroblasts, incubated in a serum-containing medium, were found to selectively attach to the protein-adhesive areas, where they developed focal contacts. No interaction of cells with the PLL-g-PEG-coated SiO2 areas was evident for at least 14 days. This patterning approach, termed selective molecular assembly patterning, is considered to be suitable for reproducible and cost-effective fabrication of biologically relevant chemical patterns over large areas.",
author = "Roger Michel and Lussi, {Jost W.} and Gabor Csucs and Ilya Reviakine and Gaudenz Danuser and Brigitte Ketterer and Hubbell, {Jeffrey A.} and Marcus Textor and Spencer, {Nicholas D.}",
year = "2002",
month = "4",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1021/la011715y",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "3281--3287",
journal = "Langmuir",
issn = "0743-7463",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Selective molecular assembly patterning

T2 - A new approach to micro- and nanochemical patterning of surfaces for biological applications

AU - Michel, Roger

AU - Lussi, Jost W.

AU - Csucs, Gabor

AU - Reviakine, Ilya

AU - Danuser, Gaudenz

AU - Ketterer, Brigitte

AU - Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

AU - Textor, Marcus

AU - Spencer, Nicholas D.

PY - 2002/4/16

Y1 - 2002/4/16

N2 - A novel patterning technique based on selective self-assembly of alkane phosphates on metal oxide surfaces is presented. Standard photolithography was used to create patterns of titanium dioxide within a matrix of silicon dioxide. Alkane phosphates were found to self-assemble on TiO2, but not on SiO2, surfaces. Subsequent adsorption of poly(L-lysine)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) rendered the exposed SiO2 surface resistant to protein adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry were employed to monitor the assembly processes. Protein-adsorption studies by means of fluorescence microscopy conclusively established that the resulting surfaces displayed protein-adhesive, alkyl phosphate modified TiO2 features, arranged within a protein-resistant PLL-g-PEG-modified SiO2 matrix. Human foreskin fibroblasts, incubated in a serum-containing medium, were found to selectively attach to the protein-adhesive areas, where they developed focal contacts. No interaction of cells with the PLL-g-PEG-coated SiO2 areas was evident for at least 14 days. This patterning approach, termed selective molecular assembly patterning, is considered to be suitable for reproducible and cost-effective fabrication of biologically relevant chemical patterns over large areas.

AB - A novel patterning technique based on selective self-assembly of alkane phosphates on metal oxide surfaces is presented. Standard photolithography was used to create patterns of titanium dioxide within a matrix of silicon dioxide. Alkane phosphates were found to self-assemble on TiO2, but not on SiO2, surfaces. Subsequent adsorption of poly(L-lysine)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) rendered the exposed SiO2 surface resistant to protein adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry were employed to monitor the assembly processes. Protein-adsorption studies by means of fluorescence microscopy conclusively established that the resulting surfaces displayed protein-adhesive, alkyl phosphate modified TiO2 features, arranged within a protein-resistant PLL-g-PEG-modified SiO2 matrix. Human foreskin fibroblasts, incubated in a serum-containing medium, were found to selectively attach to the protein-adhesive areas, where they developed focal contacts. No interaction of cells with the PLL-g-PEG-coated SiO2 areas was evident for at least 14 days. This patterning approach, termed selective molecular assembly patterning, is considered to be suitable for reproducible and cost-effective fabrication of biologically relevant chemical patterns over large areas.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037117864&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037117864&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/la011715y

DO - 10.1021/la011715y

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 3281

EP - 3287

JO - Langmuir

JF - Langmuir

SN - 0743-7463

IS - 8

ER -