Selective attention to emotional faces following recovery from depression

Jutta Joormann, Ian H. Gotlib

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

349 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was designed to examine attentional biases in the processing of emotional faces in currently and formerly depressed participants and healthy controls. Using a dot-probe task, the authors presented faces expressing happy or sad emotions paired with emotionally neutral faces. Whereas both currently and formerly depressed participants selectively attended to the sad faces, the control participants selectively avoided the sad faces and oriented toward the happy faces, a positive bias that was not observed for either of the depressed groups. These results indicate that attentional biases in the processing of emotional faces are evident even after individuals have recovered from a depressive episode. Implications of these findings for understanding the roles of cognitive and interpersonal functioning in depression are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-85
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume116
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007

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Depression
Healthy Volunteers
Emotions
Attentional Bias

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Bias
  • Depression
  • Emotion
  • Faces

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Selective attention to emotional faces following recovery from depression. / Joormann, Jutta; Gotlib, Ian H.

In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol. 116, No. 1, 01.02.2007, p. 80-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Joormann, Jutta ; Gotlib, Ian H. / Selective attention to emotional faces following recovery from depression. In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 2007 ; Vol. 116, No. 1. pp. 80-85.
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