Scaling back goals and recalibration of the affect system are processes in normal adaptive self-regulation: Understanding 'response shift' phenomena

Charles S Carver, Michael F. Scheier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

120 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This comment addresses a set of phenomena that have been labeled 'response shift'. We argue that many of these phenomena reflect recalibration of a goal-seeking system and an affect-management system, both of which are involved in normal adaptive self-regulation. In brief, we hold that these systems act as feedback control mechanisms. The reference values for both systems continuously undergo gradual recalibration. Because in most circumstances the adjustments tend to occur with equivalent frequency in both directions, their cumulative effect is minimal. In situations of either unusually prolonged goal attainment (and overattainment) or unusually prolonged adversity (as occurs, e.g., with deteriorating health), the cumulative effect can be substantial. We believe that these latter recalibrations of reference value account for many response shift phenomena. Other such phenomena are accounted for by the principle of hierarchical organization among the self-regulatory goals that comprise the self. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1715-1722
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume50
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2000

Fingerprint

self-regulation
scaling
Reference Values
Social Adjustment
Ego
Health
organization
Self-Control
Self-regulation
Scaling
Response shift
regulation
effect
health
management
Cumulative effects

Keywords

  • Goals
  • Quality of life
  • Reference value
  • Response shift
  • Self-regulation
  • Theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Development
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

@article{19cdaf3842ee43139b9338d66ad2c442,
title = "Scaling back goals and recalibration of the affect system are processes in normal adaptive self-regulation: Understanding 'response shift' phenomena",
abstract = "This comment addresses a set of phenomena that have been labeled 'response shift'. We argue that many of these phenomena reflect recalibration of a goal-seeking system and an affect-management system, both of which are involved in normal adaptive self-regulation. In brief, we hold that these systems act as feedback control mechanisms. The reference values for both systems continuously undergo gradual recalibration. Because in most circumstances the adjustments tend to occur with equivalent frequency in both directions, their cumulative effect is minimal. In situations of either unusually prolonged goal attainment (and overattainment) or unusually prolonged adversity (as occurs, e.g., with deteriorating health), the cumulative effect can be substantial. We believe that these latter recalibrations of reference value account for many response shift phenomena. Other such phenomena are accounted for by the principle of hierarchical organization among the self-regulatory goals that comprise the self. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.",
keywords = "Goals, Quality of life, Reference value, Response shift, Self-regulation, Theory",
author = "Carver, {Charles S} and Scheier, {Michael F.}",
year = "2000",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0277-9536(99)00412-8",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "1715--1722",
journal = "Social Science and Medicine",
issn = "0277-9536",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Scaling back goals and recalibration of the affect system are processes in normal adaptive self-regulation

T2 - Understanding 'response shift' phenomena

AU - Carver, Charles S

AU - Scheier, Michael F.

PY - 2000/6/1

Y1 - 2000/6/1

N2 - This comment addresses a set of phenomena that have been labeled 'response shift'. We argue that many of these phenomena reflect recalibration of a goal-seeking system and an affect-management system, both of which are involved in normal adaptive self-regulation. In brief, we hold that these systems act as feedback control mechanisms. The reference values for both systems continuously undergo gradual recalibration. Because in most circumstances the adjustments tend to occur with equivalent frequency in both directions, their cumulative effect is minimal. In situations of either unusually prolonged goal attainment (and overattainment) or unusually prolonged adversity (as occurs, e.g., with deteriorating health), the cumulative effect can be substantial. We believe that these latter recalibrations of reference value account for many response shift phenomena. Other such phenomena are accounted for by the principle of hierarchical organization among the self-regulatory goals that comprise the self. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

AB - This comment addresses a set of phenomena that have been labeled 'response shift'. We argue that many of these phenomena reflect recalibration of a goal-seeking system and an affect-management system, both of which are involved in normal adaptive self-regulation. In brief, we hold that these systems act as feedback control mechanisms. The reference values for both systems continuously undergo gradual recalibration. Because in most circumstances the adjustments tend to occur with equivalent frequency in both directions, their cumulative effect is minimal. In situations of either unusually prolonged goal attainment (and overattainment) or unusually prolonged adversity (as occurs, e.g., with deteriorating health), the cumulative effect can be substantial. We believe that these latter recalibrations of reference value account for many response shift phenomena. Other such phenomena are accounted for by the principle of hierarchical organization among the self-regulatory goals that comprise the self. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

KW - Goals

KW - Quality of life

KW - Reference value

KW - Response shift

KW - Self-regulation

KW - Theory

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034098195&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034098195&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0277-9536(99)00412-8

DO - 10.1016/S0277-9536(99)00412-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 10798327

AN - SCOPUS:0034098195

VL - 50

SP - 1715

EP - 1722

JO - Social Science and Medicine

JF - Social Science and Medicine

SN - 0277-9536

IS - 12

ER -