Satisfaction with web-based training in an integrated healthcare delivery network

Do age, education, computer skills and attitudes matter?

Ashish Atreja, Neil B. Mehta, Anil K. Jain, C. M. Harris, Hemant Ishwaran, Michel Avital, Andrew J. Fishleder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Healthcare institutions spend enormous time and effort to train their workforce. Web-based training can potentially streamline this process. However the deployment of web-based training in a large-scale setting with a diverse healthcare workforce has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction of healthcare professionals with web-based training and to determine the predictors of such satisfaction including age, education status and computer proficiency. Methods. Observational, cross-sectional survey of healthcare professionals from six hospital systems in an integrated delivery network. We measured overall satisfaction to web-based training and response to survey items measuring Website Usability, Course Usefulness, Instructional Design Effectiveness, Computer Proficiency and Self-learning Attitude. Results. A total of 17,891 healthcare professionals completed the web-based training on HIPAA Privacy Rule; and of these, 13,537 completed the survey (response rate 75.6%). Overall course satisfaction was good (median, 4; scale, 1 to 5) with more than 75% of the respondents satisfied with the training (rating 4 or 5) and 65% preferring web-based training over traditional instructor-led training (rating 4 or 5). Multivariable ordinal regression revealed 3 key predictors of satisfaction with web-based training: Instructional Design Effectiveness, Website Usability and Course Usefulness. Demographic predictors such as gender, age and education did not have an effect on satisfaction. Conclusion. The study shows that web-based training when tailored to learners' background, is perceived as a satisfactory mode of learning by an interdisciplinary group of healthcare professionals, irrespective of age, education level or prior computer experience. Future studies should aim to measure the long-term outcomes of web-based training.

Original languageEnglish
Article number48
JournalBMC Medical Education
Volume8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 6 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Delivery of Health Care
Education
education
Learning
Integrated Delivery of Health Care
Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
Privacy
website
rating
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
hospital system
learning
privacy
instructor
Surveys and Questionnaires
regression
gender
experience
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Satisfaction with web-based training in an integrated healthcare delivery network : Do age, education, computer skills and attitudes matter? / Atreja, Ashish; Mehta, Neil B.; Jain, Anil K.; Harris, C. M.; Ishwaran, Hemant; Avital, Michel; Fishleder, Andrew J.

In: BMC Medical Education, Vol. 8, 48, 06.11.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Atreja, Ashish ; Mehta, Neil B. ; Jain, Anil K. ; Harris, C. M. ; Ishwaran, Hemant ; Avital, Michel ; Fishleder, Andrew J. / Satisfaction with web-based training in an integrated healthcare delivery network : Do age, education, computer skills and attitudes matter?. In: BMC Medical Education. 2008 ; Vol. 8.
@article{bd064fcd09a64e3f961d72636d6adc3e,
title = "Satisfaction with web-based training in an integrated healthcare delivery network: Do age, education, computer skills and attitudes matter?",
abstract = "Background. Healthcare institutions spend enormous time and effort to train their workforce. Web-based training can potentially streamline this process. However the deployment of web-based training in a large-scale setting with a diverse healthcare workforce has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction of healthcare professionals with web-based training and to determine the predictors of such satisfaction including age, education status and computer proficiency. Methods. Observational, cross-sectional survey of healthcare professionals from six hospital systems in an integrated delivery network. We measured overall satisfaction to web-based training and response to survey items measuring Website Usability, Course Usefulness, Instructional Design Effectiveness, Computer Proficiency and Self-learning Attitude. Results. A total of 17,891 healthcare professionals completed the web-based training on HIPAA Privacy Rule; and of these, 13,537 completed the survey (response rate 75.6{\%}). Overall course satisfaction was good (median, 4; scale, 1 to 5) with more than 75{\%} of the respondents satisfied with the training (rating 4 or 5) and 65{\%} preferring web-based training over traditional instructor-led training (rating 4 or 5). Multivariable ordinal regression revealed 3 key predictors of satisfaction with web-based training: Instructional Design Effectiveness, Website Usability and Course Usefulness. Demographic predictors such as gender, age and education did not have an effect on satisfaction. Conclusion. The study shows that web-based training when tailored to learners' background, is perceived as a satisfactory mode of learning by an interdisciplinary group of healthcare professionals, irrespective of age, education level or prior computer experience. Future studies should aim to measure the long-term outcomes of web-based training.",
author = "Ashish Atreja and Mehta, {Neil B.} and Jain, {Anil K.} and Harris, {C. M.} and Hemant Ishwaran and Michel Avital and Fishleder, {Andrew J.}",
year = "2008",
month = "11",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1186/1472-6920-8-48",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "BMC Medical Education",
issn = "1472-6920",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Satisfaction with web-based training in an integrated healthcare delivery network

T2 - Do age, education, computer skills and attitudes matter?

AU - Atreja, Ashish

AU - Mehta, Neil B.

AU - Jain, Anil K.

AU - Harris, C. M.

AU - Ishwaran, Hemant

AU - Avital, Michel

AU - Fishleder, Andrew J.

PY - 2008/11/6

Y1 - 2008/11/6

N2 - Background. Healthcare institutions spend enormous time and effort to train their workforce. Web-based training can potentially streamline this process. However the deployment of web-based training in a large-scale setting with a diverse healthcare workforce has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction of healthcare professionals with web-based training and to determine the predictors of such satisfaction including age, education status and computer proficiency. Methods. Observational, cross-sectional survey of healthcare professionals from six hospital systems in an integrated delivery network. We measured overall satisfaction to web-based training and response to survey items measuring Website Usability, Course Usefulness, Instructional Design Effectiveness, Computer Proficiency and Self-learning Attitude. Results. A total of 17,891 healthcare professionals completed the web-based training on HIPAA Privacy Rule; and of these, 13,537 completed the survey (response rate 75.6%). Overall course satisfaction was good (median, 4; scale, 1 to 5) with more than 75% of the respondents satisfied with the training (rating 4 or 5) and 65% preferring web-based training over traditional instructor-led training (rating 4 or 5). Multivariable ordinal regression revealed 3 key predictors of satisfaction with web-based training: Instructional Design Effectiveness, Website Usability and Course Usefulness. Demographic predictors such as gender, age and education did not have an effect on satisfaction. Conclusion. The study shows that web-based training when tailored to learners' background, is perceived as a satisfactory mode of learning by an interdisciplinary group of healthcare professionals, irrespective of age, education level or prior computer experience. Future studies should aim to measure the long-term outcomes of web-based training.

AB - Background. Healthcare institutions spend enormous time and effort to train their workforce. Web-based training can potentially streamline this process. However the deployment of web-based training in a large-scale setting with a diverse healthcare workforce has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction of healthcare professionals with web-based training and to determine the predictors of such satisfaction including age, education status and computer proficiency. Methods. Observational, cross-sectional survey of healthcare professionals from six hospital systems in an integrated delivery network. We measured overall satisfaction to web-based training and response to survey items measuring Website Usability, Course Usefulness, Instructional Design Effectiveness, Computer Proficiency and Self-learning Attitude. Results. A total of 17,891 healthcare professionals completed the web-based training on HIPAA Privacy Rule; and of these, 13,537 completed the survey (response rate 75.6%). Overall course satisfaction was good (median, 4; scale, 1 to 5) with more than 75% of the respondents satisfied with the training (rating 4 or 5) and 65% preferring web-based training over traditional instructor-led training (rating 4 or 5). Multivariable ordinal regression revealed 3 key predictors of satisfaction with web-based training: Instructional Design Effectiveness, Website Usability and Course Usefulness. Demographic predictors such as gender, age and education did not have an effect on satisfaction. Conclusion. The study shows that web-based training when tailored to learners' background, is perceived as a satisfactory mode of learning by an interdisciplinary group of healthcare professionals, irrespective of age, education level or prior computer experience. Future studies should aim to measure the long-term outcomes of web-based training.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=55149121643&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=55149121643&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1472-6920-8-48

DO - 10.1186/1472-6920-8-48

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - BMC Medical Education

JF - BMC Medical Education

SN - 1472-6920

M1 - 48

ER -