Satisfaction With Communication in Primary Care for Spanish-Speaking and English-Speaking Parents

Kori B. Flower, Asheley C. Skinner, H. Shonna Yin, Russell L. Rothman, Lee M. Sanders, Alan Delamater, Eliana M. Perrin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Objective Effective communication with primary care physicians is important yet incompletely understood for Spanish-speaking parents. We predicted lower satisfaction among Spanish-speaking compared to English-speaking Latino and non-Latino parents. Methods Cross-sectional analysis at 2-month well visits within the Greenlight study at 4 pediatric resident clinics. Parents reported satisfaction with 14 physician communication items using the validated Communication Assessment Tool (CAT). High satisfaction was defined as “excellent” on each CAT item. Mean estimations compared satisfaction for communication items among Spanish- and English-speaking Latinos and non-Latinos. We used generalized linear regression modeling, adjusted for parent age, education, income, and clinic site. Among Spanish-speaking parents, we compared visits conducted in Spanish with and without an interpreter, and in English. Results Compared to English-speaking Latino (n = 127) and non-Latino parents (n = 432), fewer Spanish-speaking parents (n = 303) reported satisfaction with 14 communication items. No significant differences were found between English-speaking Latinos and non-Latinos. Greatest differences were found in the use of a greeting that made the parent comfortable (59.4% of Spanish-speaking Latinos endorsing “excellent” vs 77.5% English-speaking Latinos, P < .01) and discussing follow-up (62.5% of Spanish-speaking Latinos vs 79.8% English-speaking Latinos, P < .01). After adjusting for parent age, education, income, and study site, Spanish-speaking Latinos were still less likely to report high satisfaction with these communication items. Satisfaction was not different among Spanish-speaking parents when the physician spoke Spanish versus used an interpreter. Conclusions Satisfaction with physician communication was associated with language but not ethnicity. Spanish-speaking parents less frequently report satisfaction with communication, and innovative solutions to enhance communication quality are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)416-423
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2017

Keywords

  • Spanish speaking
  • parent satisfaction
  • physician communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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    Flower, K. B., Skinner, A. C., Yin, H. S., Rothman, R. L., Sanders, L. M., Delamater, A., & Perrin, E. M. (2017). Satisfaction With Communication in Primary Care for Spanish-Speaking and English-Speaking Parents. Academic Pediatrics, 17(4), 416-423. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2017.01.005