San Diego de Pamatácuaro: A Mountain Shrine in Colonial Mexico

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter examines the apparent contradiction surrounding a shrine in a small mountain town in western Mexico after Spanish contact. The residents of a wholly and monolingually indigenous town, Pamatácuaro, erected a shrine to their town’s patron saint, San Diego. The shrine was at least in part a propitiation for succor in the face of epidemic disease and colonial predation. Yet it had no formal approval from the diocese and the town never had a resident priest. The shrine, then, took on a life of its own—a place where indigenous people claiming Catholicism as their official religion sought the favor of a Catholic saint even as the lived religion of the region was a synthesis of Spanish Catholicism and Purépecha animism. As such the shrine occupied an intermediate space in a network of cultural, political and spiritual exchange and transit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures
PublisherSpringer Science and Business Media B.V.
Pages177-195
Number of pages19
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Publication series

NameSophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures
Volume32
ISSN (Print)2211-1107
ISSN (Electronic)2211-1115

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Religious studies
  • Gender Studies

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