Salinity patterns of Florida Bay

Christopher R. Kelble, Elizabeth M. Johns, William K. Nuttle, Thomas N. Lee, Ryan H. Smith, Peter B. Ortner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The salinity of Florida Bay has undergone dramatic changes over the past century. Salinity values reached their most extreme, up to 70, in the late 1980s, concurrent with ecological changes in Florida Bay including a mass seagrass die-off. In this study, surface salinity was measured at approximately monthly intervals between 1998 and 2004. The 7-year data set was analyzed to quantify the effects of precipitation, runoff, evaporation, and climatic variability on salinity in Florida Bay. Overall mean Bay-wide salinity varied from a low of 24.2 just after the passing of Hurricane Irene in October 1999 to a high of 41.8 near the end of a drought period in July 2001. Bay-wide mean salinity exhibited dramatic decreases, up to -0.5 per day, whereas increases were slower, with a maximum rate of 0.1 per day. The freshwater budget for Florida Bay was slightly negative on an annual basis with significant positive monthly values observed during the peak of the rainy season (August through October) and significant negative monthly values observed during the peak of the dry season (March through May). This resulted in a minimum mean monthly Bay-wide salinity in January and a maximum monthly mean in July. Mean salinity for the overall Bay and for each of its four sub-regions could be predicted with reasonable accuracy utilizing a mass balance box model. There was no monotonic trend in salinity over this 7-year study; however, meteorological phenomena, such as tropical cyclones and El Nino-Southern Oscillation, dramatically altered the salinity patterns of Florida Bay on interannual time scales.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)318-334
Number of pages17
JournalEstuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
Volume71
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

Fingerprint

salinity
hurricanes
die-off
El Nino
tropical cyclone
seagrass
hurricane
El Nino-Southern Oscillation
evaporation
dry season
mass balance
wet season
runoff
drought
timescale

Keywords

  • environmental monitoring
  • Florida
  • Florida Bay
  • salinity gradient
  • seasonal variability
  • spatial distribution
  • USA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Oceanography

Cite this

Kelble, C. R., Johns, E. M., Nuttle, W. K., Lee, T. N., Smith, R. H., & Ortner, P. B. (2007). Salinity patterns of Florida Bay. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 71(1-2), 318-334. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecss.2006.08.006

Salinity patterns of Florida Bay. / Kelble, Christopher R.; Johns, Elizabeth M.; Nuttle, William K.; Lee, Thomas N.; Smith, Ryan H.; Ortner, Peter B.

In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, Vol. 71, No. 1-2, 01.01.2007, p. 318-334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kelble, CR, Johns, EM, Nuttle, WK, Lee, TN, Smith, RH & Ortner, PB 2007, 'Salinity patterns of Florida Bay', Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, vol. 71, no. 1-2, pp. 318-334. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecss.2006.08.006
Kelble CR, Johns EM, Nuttle WK, Lee TN, Smith RH, Ortner PB. Salinity patterns of Florida Bay. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. 2007 Jan 1;71(1-2):318-334. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecss.2006.08.006
Kelble, Christopher R. ; Johns, Elizabeth M. ; Nuttle, William K. ; Lee, Thomas N. ; Smith, Ryan H. ; Ortner, Peter B. / Salinity patterns of Florida Bay. In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science. 2007 ; Vol. 71, No. 1-2. pp. 318-334.
@article{d9988a1a56ea494da3985c9db8e2cce0,
title = "Salinity patterns of Florida Bay",
abstract = "The salinity of Florida Bay has undergone dramatic changes over the past century. Salinity values reached their most extreme, up to 70, in the late 1980s, concurrent with ecological changes in Florida Bay including a mass seagrass die-off. In this study, surface salinity was measured at approximately monthly intervals between 1998 and 2004. The 7-year data set was analyzed to quantify the effects of precipitation, runoff, evaporation, and climatic variability on salinity in Florida Bay. Overall mean Bay-wide salinity varied from a low of 24.2 just after the passing of Hurricane Irene in October 1999 to a high of 41.8 near the end of a drought period in July 2001. Bay-wide mean salinity exhibited dramatic decreases, up to -0.5 per day, whereas increases were slower, with a maximum rate of 0.1 per day. The freshwater budget for Florida Bay was slightly negative on an annual basis with significant positive monthly values observed during the peak of the rainy season (August through October) and significant negative monthly values observed during the peak of the dry season (March through May). This resulted in a minimum mean monthly Bay-wide salinity in January and a maximum monthly mean in July. Mean salinity for the overall Bay and for each of its four sub-regions could be predicted with reasonable accuracy utilizing a mass balance box model. There was no monotonic trend in salinity over this 7-year study; however, meteorological phenomena, such as tropical cyclones and El Nino-Southern Oscillation, dramatically altered the salinity patterns of Florida Bay on interannual time scales.",
keywords = "environmental monitoring, Florida, Florida Bay, salinity gradient, seasonal variability, spatial distribution, USA",
author = "Kelble, {Christopher R.} and Johns, {Elizabeth M.} and Nuttle, {William K.} and Lee, {Thomas N.} and Smith, {Ryan H.} and Ortner, {Peter B.}",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ecss.2006.08.006",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "318--334",
journal = "Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science",
issn = "0272-7714",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Salinity patterns of Florida Bay

AU - Kelble, Christopher R.

AU - Johns, Elizabeth M.

AU - Nuttle, William K.

AU - Lee, Thomas N.

AU - Smith, Ryan H.

AU - Ortner, Peter B.

PY - 2007/1/1

Y1 - 2007/1/1

N2 - The salinity of Florida Bay has undergone dramatic changes over the past century. Salinity values reached their most extreme, up to 70, in the late 1980s, concurrent with ecological changes in Florida Bay including a mass seagrass die-off. In this study, surface salinity was measured at approximately monthly intervals between 1998 and 2004. The 7-year data set was analyzed to quantify the effects of precipitation, runoff, evaporation, and climatic variability on salinity in Florida Bay. Overall mean Bay-wide salinity varied from a low of 24.2 just after the passing of Hurricane Irene in October 1999 to a high of 41.8 near the end of a drought period in July 2001. Bay-wide mean salinity exhibited dramatic decreases, up to -0.5 per day, whereas increases were slower, with a maximum rate of 0.1 per day. The freshwater budget for Florida Bay was slightly negative on an annual basis with significant positive monthly values observed during the peak of the rainy season (August through October) and significant negative monthly values observed during the peak of the dry season (March through May). This resulted in a minimum mean monthly Bay-wide salinity in January and a maximum monthly mean in July. Mean salinity for the overall Bay and for each of its four sub-regions could be predicted with reasonable accuracy utilizing a mass balance box model. There was no monotonic trend in salinity over this 7-year study; however, meteorological phenomena, such as tropical cyclones and El Nino-Southern Oscillation, dramatically altered the salinity patterns of Florida Bay on interannual time scales.

AB - The salinity of Florida Bay has undergone dramatic changes over the past century. Salinity values reached their most extreme, up to 70, in the late 1980s, concurrent with ecological changes in Florida Bay including a mass seagrass die-off. In this study, surface salinity was measured at approximately monthly intervals between 1998 and 2004. The 7-year data set was analyzed to quantify the effects of precipitation, runoff, evaporation, and climatic variability on salinity in Florida Bay. Overall mean Bay-wide salinity varied from a low of 24.2 just after the passing of Hurricane Irene in October 1999 to a high of 41.8 near the end of a drought period in July 2001. Bay-wide mean salinity exhibited dramatic decreases, up to -0.5 per day, whereas increases were slower, with a maximum rate of 0.1 per day. The freshwater budget for Florida Bay was slightly negative on an annual basis with significant positive monthly values observed during the peak of the rainy season (August through October) and significant negative monthly values observed during the peak of the dry season (March through May). This resulted in a minimum mean monthly Bay-wide salinity in January and a maximum monthly mean in July. Mean salinity for the overall Bay and for each of its four sub-regions could be predicted with reasonable accuracy utilizing a mass balance box model. There was no monotonic trend in salinity over this 7-year study; however, meteorological phenomena, such as tropical cyclones and El Nino-Southern Oscillation, dramatically altered the salinity patterns of Florida Bay on interannual time scales.

KW - environmental monitoring

KW - Florida

KW - Florida Bay

KW - salinity gradient

KW - seasonal variability

KW - spatial distribution

KW - USA

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33845680769&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33845680769&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ecss.2006.08.006

DO - 10.1016/j.ecss.2006.08.006

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33845680769

VL - 71

SP - 318

EP - 334

JO - Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science

JF - Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science

SN - 0272-7714

IS - 1-2

ER -