Salience network dynamics underlying successful resistance of temptation

Rosa Steimke, Jason Nomi, Vince D. Calhoun, Christine Stelzel, Lena M. Paschke, Robert Gaschler, Thomas Goschke, Henrik Walter, Lucina Q Uddin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-control and the ability to resist temptation are critical for successful completion of long-termgoals. Contemporary models in cognitive neuroscience emphasize the primary role of prefrontal cognitive control networks in aligning behavior with such goals. Here, we use gaze pattern analysis and dynamic functional connectivity fMRI data to explore how individual differences in the ability to resist temptation are related to intrinsic brain dynamics of the cognitive control and salience networks. Behaviorally, individuals exhibit greater gaze distance from target location (e.g. higher distractibility) during presentation of tempting erotic images compared with neutral images. Individuals whose intrinsic dynamic functional connectivity patterns gravitate toward configurations in which salience detection systems are less strongly coupled with visual systems resist tempting distractors more effectively. The ability to resist tempting distractors was not significantly related to intrinsic dynamics of the cognitive control network. These results suggest that susceptibility to temptation is governed in part by individual differences in salience network dynamics and provide novel evidence for involvement of brain systems outside canonical cognitive control networks in contributing to individual differences in self-control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1928-1939
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Aptitude
Individuality
Brain
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Self-Control

Keywords

  • Dynamic functional connectivity
  • Resting-state fMRI
  • Salience network
  • Self-control
  • Temptation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Salience network dynamics underlying successful resistance of temptation. / Steimke, Rosa; Nomi, Jason; Calhoun, Vince D.; Stelzel, Christine; Paschke, Lena M.; Gaschler, Robert; Goschke, Thomas; Walter, Henrik; Uddin, Lucina Q.

In: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Vol. 12, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 1928-1939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steimke, R, Nomi, J, Calhoun, VD, Stelzel, C, Paschke, LM, Gaschler, R, Goschke, T, Walter, H & Uddin, LQ 2017, 'Salience network dynamics underlying successful resistance of temptation', Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, vol. 12, no. 12, pp. 1928-1939. https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsx123
Steimke, Rosa ; Nomi, Jason ; Calhoun, Vince D. ; Stelzel, Christine ; Paschke, Lena M. ; Gaschler, Robert ; Goschke, Thomas ; Walter, Henrik ; Uddin, Lucina Q. / Salience network dynamics underlying successful resistance of temptation. In: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 12. pp. 1928-1939.
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