Sad Eyes, Crooked Crosses: Religious Struggles, Psychological Distress and the Mediating Role of Psychosocial Resources

Terrence D. Hill, Liwen Zeng, Simone Rambotti, Krysia N. Mossakowski, Robert J. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this paper, we employed data from the 2011 Miami-Dade Health Survey (n = 444) to formally test whether the association between religious struggles and psychological distress is mediated by psychosocial resources. We found that religious struggles were associated with lower levels of social support, self-esteem, the sense of control, and self-control. We also observed that religious struggles were associated with higher levels of non-specific emotional distress, depression, and anxiety, but not somatization. Our mediation analyses revealed significant indirect effects of religious struggles on emotional distress (not somatization) through social support, self-esteem, and the sense of control, but not self-control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Mental health
  • Religious struggles
  • Self-esteem
  • Sense of control
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Religious studies

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sad Eyes, Crooked Crosses: Religious Struggles, Psychological Distress and the Mediating Role of Psychosocial Resources'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this