rTMS to the right inferior parietal lobule disrupts self-other discrimination.

Lucina Q. Uddin, Istvan Molnar-Szakacs, Eran Zaidel, Marco Iacoboni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

171 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-other discrimination is fundamental to social interaction, however, little is known about the neural systems underlying this ability. In a previous functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we demonstrated that a right fronto-parietal network is activated during viewing of self-faces as compared with the faces of familiar others. Here we used image-guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to create a 'virtual lesion' over the parietal component of this network to test whether this region is necessary for discriminating self-faces from other familiar faces. The current results indeed show that 1 Hz rTMS to the right inferior parietal lobule (IPL) selectively disrupts performance on a self-other discrimination task. Applying 1 Hz rTMS to the left IPL had no effect. It appears that activity in the right IPL is essential to the task, thus providing for the first time evidence for a causal relation between a human brain area and this high-level cognitive capacity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-71
Number of pages7
JournalSocial cognitive and affective neuroscience
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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