Role of the peroneal tendons in the production of the deformed foot with posterior tibial tendon deficiency

Mark S. Mizel, H. Thomas Temple, Pierce E. Scranton, Richard E. Gellman, Paul J. Hecht, Greg A. Horton, Leland C. McCluskey, Kathleen A. McHale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ten patients were identified with traumatic, complete common peroneal nerve palsy, with no previous foot or ankle surgery or trauma distal to the knee, who had undergone anterior transfer of the posterior tibial tendon to the midfoot. Six of these patients had a transfer to the midfoot and four had a Bridle procedure with tenodesis of half of the posterior tibial tendon to the peroneus longus tendon. Average follow-up was 74.9 months (range, 18-351 months). All patients' feet were compared assessing residual muscle strength, the longitudinal arch, and motion at the ankle, subtalar, and Chopart's joint. Weightbearing lateral X-rays and Harris mat studies were done on both feet. In no case was any valgus hindfoot deformity associated with posterior tibial tendon rupture found. It seems that the pathologic condition associated with a posterior tibial tendon deficient foot will not manifest itself if peroneus brevis function is absent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-289
Number of pages5
JournalFoot and Ankle International
Volume20
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tendons
Foot
Ankle
Tenodesis
Subtalar Joint
Peroneal Nerve
Weight-Bearing
Muscle Strength
Paralysis
Rupture
Knee
X-Rays
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Mizel, M. S., Thomas Temple, H., Scranton, P. E., Gellman, R. E., Hecht, P. J., Horton, G. A., ... McHale, K. A. (1999). Role of the peroneal tendons in the production of the deformed foot with posterior tibial tendon deficiency. Foot and Ankle International, 20(5), 285-289.

Role of the peroneal tendons in the production of the deformed foot with posterior tibial tendon deficiency. / Mizel, Mark S.; Thomas Temple, H.; Scranton, Pierce E.; Gellman, Richard E.; Hecht, Paul J.; Horton, Greg A.; McCluskey, Leland C.; McHale, Kathleen A.

In: Foot and Ankle International, Vol. 20, No. 5, 01.05.1999, p. 285-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mizel, MS, Thomas Temple, H, Scranton, PE, Gellman, RE, Hecht, PJ, Horton, GA, McCluskey, LC & McHale, KA 1999, 'Role of the peroneal tendons in the production of the deformed foot with posterior tibial tendon deficiency', Foot and Ankle International, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 285-289.
Mizel MS, Thomas Temple H, Scranton PE, Gellman RE, Hecht PJ, Horton GA et al. Role of the peroneal tendons in the production of the deformed foot with posterior tibial tendon deficiency. Foot and Ankle International. 1999 May 1;20(5):285-289.
Mizel, Mark S. ; Thomas Temple, H. ; Scranton, Pierce E. ; Gellman, Richard E. ; Hecht, Paul J. ; Horton, Greg A. ; McCluskey, Leland C. ; McHale, Kathleen A. / Role of the peroneal tendons in the production of the deformed foot with posterior tibial tendon deficiency. In: Foot and Ankle International. 1999 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 285-289.
@article{f114c9eb6dc04f848bc1a17cd0a11c97,
title = "Role of the peroneal tendons in the production of the deformed foot with posterior tibial tendon deficiency",
abstract = "Ten patients were identified with traumatic, complete common peroneal nerve palsy, with no previous foot or ankle surgery or trauma distal to the knee, who had undergone anterior transfer of the posterior tibial tendon to the midfoot. Six of these patients had a transfer to the midfoot and four had a Bridle procedure with tenodesis of half of the posterior tibial tendon to the peroneus longus tendon. Average follow-up was 74.9 months (range, 18-351 months). All patients' feet were compared assessing residual muscle strength, the longitudinal arch, and motion at the ankle, subtalar, and Chopart's joint. Weightbearing lateral X-rays and Harris mat studies were done on both feet. In no case was any valgus hindfoot deformity associated with posterior tibial tendon rupture found. It seems that the pathologic condition associated with a posterior tibial tendon deficient foot will not manifest itself if peroneus brevis function is absent.",
author = "Mizel, {Mark S.} and {Thomas Temple}, H. and Scranton, {Pierce E.} and Gellman, {Richard E.} and Hecht, {Paul J.} and Horton, {Greg A.} and McCluskey, {Leland C.} and McHale, {Kathleen A.}",
year = "1999",
month = "5",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "285--289",
journal = "Foot and Ankle International",
issn = "1071-1007",
publisher = "AOFAS - American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Role of the peroneal tendons in the production of the deformed foot with posterior tibial tendon deficiency

AU - Mizel, Mark S.

AU - Thomas Temple, H.

AU - Scranton, Pierce E.

AU - Gellman, Richard E.

AU - Hecht, Paul J.

AU - Horton, Greg A.

AU - McCluskey, Leland C.

AU - McHale, Kathleen A.

PY - 1999/5/1

Y1 - 1999/5/1

N2 - Ten patients were identified with traumatic, complete common peroneal nerve palsy, with no previous foot or ankle surgery or trauma distal to the knee, who had undergone anterior transfer of the posterior tibial tendon to the midfoot. Six of these patients had a transfer to the midfoot and four had a Bridle procedure with tenodesis of half of the posterior tibial tendon to the peroneus longus tendon. Average follow-up was 74.9 months (range, 18-351 months). All patients' feet were compared assessing residual muscle strength, the longitudinal arch, and motion at the ankle, subtalar, and Chopart's joint. Weightbearing lateral X-rays and Harris mat studies were done on both feet. In no case was any valgus hindfoot deformity associated with posterior tibial tendon rupture found. It seems that the pathologic condition associated with a posterior tibial tendon deficient foot will not manifest itself if peroneus brevis function is absent.

AB - Ten patients were identified with traumatic, complete common peroneal nerve palsy, with no previous foot or ankle surgery or trauma distal to the knee, who had undergone anterior transfer of the posterior tibial tendon to the midfoot. Six of these patients had a transfer to the midfoot and four had a Bridle procedure with tenodesis of half of the posterior tibial tendon to the peroneus longus tendon. Average follow-up was 74.9 months (range, 18-351 months). All patients' feet were compared assessing residual muscle strength, the longitudinal arch, and motion at the ankle, subtalar, and Chopart's joint. Weightbearing lateral X-rays and Harris mat studies were done on both feet. In no case was any valgus hindfoot deformity associated with posterior tibial tendon rupture found. It seems that the pathologic condition associated with a posterior tibial tendon deficient foot will not manifest itself if peroneus brevis function is absent.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032948378&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032948378&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10353763

AN - SCOPUS:0032948378

VL - 20

SP - 285

EP - 289

JO - Foot and Ankle International

JF - Foot and Ankle International

SN - 1071-1007

IS - 5

ER -