Role of myelin-associated inhibitors in axonal repair after spinal cord injury

Jae Lee, Binhai Zheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Myelin-associated inhibitors of axon growth, including Nogo, MAG and OMgp, have been the subject of intense research. A myriad of experimental approaches have been applied to investigate the potential of targeting these molecules to promote axonal repair after spinal cord injury. However, there are still conflicting results on their role in axon regeneration and therefore a lack of a cohesive mechanism on how these molecules can be targeted to promote axon repair. One major reason may be the lack of a clear definition of axon regeneration in the first place. Nevertheless, recent data from genetic studies in mice indicate that the roles of these molecules in CNS axon repair may be more intricate than previously envisioned.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-42
Number of pages10
JournalExperimental Neurology
Volume235
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

Fingerprint

Myelin Sheath
Spinal Cord Injuries
Axons
Regeneration
Growth Inhibitors
Research

Keywords

  • Axon regeneration
  • MAG
  • Myelin
  • NgR1
  • Nogo
  • Nogo receptor
  • OMgp
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Sprouting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Role of myelin-associated inhibitors in axonal repair after spinal cord injury. / Lee, Jae; Zheng, Binhai.

In: Experimental Neurology, Vol. 235, No. 1, 01.05.2012, p. 33-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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