Role of endothelium-derived relaxing factor in regulation of vascular tone and remodeling: Update on humoral regulation of vascular tone

Jonathan P. Tolins, Pamela J. Shultz, Leopoldo Raij

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In addition to preserving the permselectivity of the vascular wall and providing an antithrombogenic surface, the vascular endothelium contributes importantly to the regulation of vasomotor tone. Indeed, the endothelium participates in the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II; the enzymatic inactivation of several plasma constituents such as bradykinin, norepinephrine, serotonin, and ADP; and the synthesis and release of vasodilator substances such as prostacyclin and the recently discovered endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). The diffusible EDRF released from the endothelium is nitric oxide or a substance closely related to it such as nitrosothiol. The endothelium also synthesizes and releases vasoconstrictive factors, including products derived from arachidonic acid metabolism and the recently discovered peptide endothelin. An increasing body of evidence from experimental and clinical studies indicates that EDRF and endothelium-derived contracting factors play an important role in vascular physiology and pathology. It has become apparent that the balance of these factors may be a major determinant of systemic and regional hemodynamics. Moreover, through generally opposite effects on growth-related vascular changes, contracting factors such as endothelin and relaxing factors such as EDRF also may be important determinants of the vascular response to injury in various disease states such as atherosclerosis and hypertension. It is clear that the vascular endothelium is a complex and dynamic organ. Understanding endothelium function in normal physiology and disease states is of potential clinical importance and should be the focus of future investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)909-916
Number of pages8
JournalHypertension
Volume17
Issue number6 SUPPL. 2
StatePublished - Jun 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Endothelium-Dependent Relaxing Factors
Endothelium
Blood Vessels
Endothelins
Vascular Endothelium
Angiotensin I
Bradykinin
Epoprostenol
Vasodilator Agents
Arachidonic Acid
Angiotensin II
Adenosine Diphosphate
Serotonin
Atherosclerosis
Norepinephrine
Nitric Oxide
Hemodynamics
Vascular Remodeling
Pathology
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Endothelium
  • Nitric oxide
  • Vascular endothelium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Role of endothelium-derived relaxing factor in regulation of vascular tone and remodeling : Update on humoral regulation of vascular tone. / Tolins, Jonathan P.; Shultz, Pamela J.; Raij, Leopoldo.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 17, No. 6 SUPPL. 2, 01.06.1990, p. 909-916.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tolins, Jonathan P. ; Shultz, Pamela J. ; Raij, Leopoldo. / Role of endothelium-derived relaxing factor in regulation of vascular tone and remodeling : Update on humoral regulation of vascular tone. In: Hypertension. 1990 ; Vol. 17, No. 6 SUPPL. 2. pp. 909-916.
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