Role of autorosette forming cells in antibody synthesis in vitro: Suppressive activity of ARFC in humoral immune response

N. Khansari, M. Petrini, F. Ambrogi, Pascal Goldschmidt-Clermont, H. H. Fudenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of autologous rosette forming cells (ARFC) in humoral immune responses was studied using an in vitro system. While depletion of ARFCs from PBL resulted in a significant increase of either total IgG or anti-TT IgG, addition of these cells to the system decreased the production of immunoglobulin to a level comparable to that of unfractionated PBL. The majority of the ARFCs reacted with anti-Leu2a and anti-Leu8. In contrast, the majority of non-ARFCs reacted with Leu3a and only 10% with Leu8 monoclonal antibodies. Stimulation of unfractionated PBL with concanavalin A (ConA) resulted in an increase of the ARFC population. ConA stimulation also increased the number of cells reactive with anti-Leu2 and/or anti-Leu8. The autorosette population had a higher purine nucleoside phosphorylation (PNP) content than the non-ARFC population. Although the ARFC suppressed synthesis of antibody by B cell in vitro when they were mixed with either autologous or allogeneic B cells, a marked proliferation of non-B cells was evident. We conclude that at least two different subpopulations of T cells are capable of forming rosettes with autologous red blood cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalImmunobiology
Volume166
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 10 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Humoral Immunity
Antibodies
Concanavalin A
B-Lymphocytes
Population
Purine Nucleosides
In Vitro Techniques
Immunoglobulins
Cell Count
Immunoglobulin G
Erythrocytes
Monoclonal Antibodies
Phosphorylation
T-Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Role of autorosette forming cells in antibody synthesis in vitro : Suppressive activity of ARFC in humoral immune response. / Khansari, N.; Petrini, M.; Ambrogi, F.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal; Fudenberg, H. H.

In: Immunobiology, Vol. 166, No. 1, 10.05.1984, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khansari, N. ; Petrini, M. ; Ambrogi, F. ; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal ; Fudenberg, H. H. / Role of autorosette forming cells in antibody synthesis in vitro : Suppressive activity of ARFC in humoral immune response. In: Immunobiology. 1984 ; Vol. 166, No. 1. pp. 1-11.
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