Role of Autorosette Forming Cells in Antibody Synthesis in vitro: Suppressive Activity of ARFC in Humoral Immune Response

N. Khansari, M. Petrini, F. Ambrogii, P. Goldschmidt-Clermont, H. H. Fudenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The role of autologous rosette forming cells (ARFC) in humoral immune responses was studied using an in vitro system. While depletion of ARFCs from PBL resulted in a significant increase of either total IgG or anti-TT IgG, addition of these cells to the system decreased the production of immunoglobulin to a level comparable to that of unfractionated PBL. The majority of the ARFCs reacted with anti-Leu2a and anti-Leu8. In contrast, the majority of non-ARFCs reacted with Leu3a and only 10% with Leu8 monoclonal antibodies. Stimulation of unfractionated PBL with concanavalin A (ConA) resulted in an increase of the ARFC population. ConA stimulation also increased the number of cells reactive with anti-Leu2 and/or anti-Leu8. The autorosette population had a higher purine nucleoside phosphorylation (PNP) content than the non-ARFC population. Although the ARFC suppressed synthesis of antibody by B cell in vitro when they were mixed with either autologous or allogeneic B cells, a marked proliferation of non-B cells was evident. We conclude that at least two different subpopulations of T cells are capable of forming rosettes with autologous red blood cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalImmunobiology
Volume166
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Hematology

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