Risk of aspiration pneumonia after an epileptic seizure: A retrospective analysis of 1634 adult patients

John C. DeToledo, Merredith Lowe, Jose Gonzalez, Helena Haddad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We reviewed the incidence of aspiration pneumonia secondary to seizures in three populations of patients with chronic epilepsy: 733 outpatients seen in an Epilepsy Foundation clinic; 806 adult patients admitted to two university video telemetry units; and 95 institutionalized, profoundly retarded adult patients with chronic epilepsy. Two of the 733 adults who had seizures in the outpatient setting and 2 of the 806 patients who had one or more epileptic seizures in the telemetry units developed aspiration pneumonia. In the 95 institutionalized patients, there were 17 instances of aspiration pneumonia after a generalized seizure and 32 instances of aspiration unrelated to seizures over a 12-month period. Our findings suggest that aspiration pneumonia is not a common complication of seizures in otherwise healthy adults. The increased incidence of aspiration in developmentally delayed individuals seems to derive from a combination of factors. Increased oral secretions, impaired swallowing mechanisms, and difficulty in attaining adequate patient positioning significantly increased the risk of aspiration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)593-595
Number of pages3
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2004

Fingerprint

Aspiration Pneumonia
Epilepsy
Seizures
Telemetry
Outpatients
Patient Positioning
Incidence
Deglutition
Population

Keywords

  • Aspiration
  • Convulsions
  • Epilepsy
  • Lateral decubitus
  • Pneumonia
  • Seizures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Risk of aspiration pneumonia after an epileptic seizure : A retrospective analysis of 1634 adult patients. / DeToledo, John C.; Lowe, Merredith; Gonzalez, Jose; Haddad, Helena.

In: Epilepsy and Behavior, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.08.2004, p. 593-595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DeToledo, John C. ; Lowe, Merredith ; Gonzalez, Jose ; Haddad, Helena. / Risk of aspiration pneumonia after an epileptic seizure : A retrospective analysis of 1634 adult patients. In: Epilepsy and Behavior. 2004 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 593-595.
@article{2288033b30c340b1831162ae16570a3d,
title = "Risk of aspiration pneumonia after an epileptic seizure: A retrospective analysis of 1634 adult patients",
abstract = "We reviewed the incidence of aspiration pneumonia secondary to seizures in three populations of patients with chronic epilepsy: 733 outpatients seen in an Epilepsy Foundation clinic; 806 adult patients admitted to two university video telemetry units; and 95 institutionalized, profoundly retarded adult patients with chronic epilepsy. Two of the 733 adults who had seizures in the outpatient setting and 2 of the 806 patients who had one or more epileptic seizures in the telemetry units developed aspiration pneumonia. In the 95 institutionalized patients, there were 17 instances of aspiration pneumonia after a generalized seizure and 32 instances of aspiration unrelated to seizures over a 12-month period. Our findings suggest that aspiration pneumonia is not a common complication of seizures in otherwise healthy adults. The increased incidence of aspiration in developmentally delayed individuals seems to derive from a combination of factors. Increased oral secretions, impaired swallowing mechanisms, and difficulty in attaining adequate patient positioning significantly increased the risk of aspiration.",
keywords = "Aspiration, Convulsions, Epilepsy, Lateral decubitus, Pneumonia, Seizures",
author = "DeToledo, {John C.} and Merredith Lowe and Jose Gonzalez and Helena Haddad",
year = "2004",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.yebeh.2004.03.009",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "593--595",
journal = "Epilepsy and Behavior",
issn = "1525-5050",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk of aspiration pneumonia after an epileptic seizure

T2 - A retrospective analysis of 1634 adult patients

AU - DeToledo, John C.

AU - Lowe, Merredith

AU - Gonzalez, Jose

AU - Haddad, Helena

PY - 2004/8/1

Y1 - 2004/8/1

N2 - We reviewed the incidence of aspiration pneumonia secondary to seizures in three populations of patients with chronic epilepsy: 733 outpatients seen in an Epilepsy Foundation clinic; 806 adult patients admitted to two university video telemetry units; and 95 institutionalized, profoundly retarded adult patients with chronic epilepsy. Two of the 733 adults who had seizures in the outpatient setting and 2 of the 806 patients who had one or more epileptic seizures in the telemetry units developed aspiration pneumonia. In the 95 institutionalized patients, there were 17 instances of aspiration pneumonia after a generalized seizure and 32 instances of aspiration unrelated to seizures over a 12-month period. Our findings suggest that aspiration pneumonia is not a common complication of seizures in otherwise healthy adults. The increased incidence of aspiration in developmentally delayed individuals seems to derive from a combination of factors. Increased oral secretions, impaired swallowing mechanisms, and difficulty in attaining adequate patient positioning significantly increased the risk of aspiration.

AB - We reviewed the incidence of aspiration pneumonia secondary to seizures in three populations of patients with chronic epilepsy: 733 outpatients seen in an Epilepsy Foundation clinic; 806 adult patients admitted to two university video telemetry units; and 95 institutionalized, profoundly retarded adult patients with chronic epilepsy. Two of the 733 adults who had seizures in the outpatient setting and 2 of the 806 patients who had one or more epileptic seizures in the telemetry units developed aspiration pneumonia. In the 95 institutionalized patients, there were 17 instances of aspiration pneumonia after a generalized seizure and 32 instances of aspiration unrelated to seizures over a 12-month period. Our findings suggest that aspiration pneumonia is not a common complication of seizures in otherwise healthy adults. The increased incidence of aspiration in developmentally delayed individuals seems to derive from a combination of factors. Increased oral secretions, impaired swallowing mechanisms, and difficulty in attaining adequate patient positioning significantly increased the risk of aspiration.

KW - Aspiration

KW - Convulsions

KW - Epilepsy

KW - Lateral decubitus

KW - Pneumonia

KW - Seizures

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4043073610&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4043073610&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.yebeh.2004.03.009

DO - 10.1016/j.yebeh.2004.03.009

M3 - Article

C2 - 15256199

AN - SCOPUS:4043073610

VL - 5

SP - 593

EP - 595

JO - Epilepsy and Behavior

JF - Epilepsy and Behavior

SN - 1525-5050

IS - 4

ER -