Risk for arterial and venous thrombosis in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms: A population-based cohort study

Malin Hultcrantz, Magnus Björkholm, Paul W. Dickman, Ola Landgren, Åsa R. Derolf, Sigurdur Y. Kristinsson, Therese M.L. Andersson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

91 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are reported to be at increased risk for thrombotic events. However, no population-based study has estimated this excess risk compared with matched control participants. Objective: To assess risk for arterial and venous thrombosis in patients with MPNs compared with matched control participants. Design: Matched cohort study. Setting: Population-based setting in Sweden from 1987 to 2009, with follow-up to 2010. Patients: 9429 patients with MPNs and 35 820 matched control participants. Measurements: The primary outcomes were rates of arterial and venous thrombosis. Flexible parametric models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and cumulative incidence with 95% CIs. Results: The HRs for arterial thrombosis among patients with MPNs compared with control participants at 3 months, 1 year, and 5 years were 3.0 (95% CI, 2.7 to 3.4), 2.0 (CI, 1.8 to 2.2), and 1.5 (CI, 1.4 to 1.6), respectively. The corresponding HRs for venous thrombosis were 9.7 (CI, 7.8 to 12.0), 4.7 (CI, 4.0 to 5.4), and 3.2 (CI, 2.9 to 3.6). The rate was significantly elevated across all age groups and was similar among MPN subtypes. The 5-year cumulative incidence of thrombosis in patients with MPNs showed an initial rapid increase followed by gentler increases during follow-up. The HR for venous thrombosis decreased during more recent calendar periods. Limitation: No information on individual laboratory results or treatment. Conclusion: Patients with MPNs across all age groups have a significantly increased rate of arterial and venous thrombosis compared with matched control participants, with the highest rates at and shortly after diagnosis. Decreases in the rate of venous thrombosis over time likely reflect advances in clinical management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-325
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of internal medicine
Volume168
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 6 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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