Risk factors for early childhood infection of human herpesvirus-8 in zambian children: The role of early childhood feeding practices

Kay L. Crabtree, Janet M. Wojcicki, Veenu Minhas, David R. Smith, Chipepo Kankasa, Charles D Mitchell, Charles Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) infection in early childhood is common throughout sub- Saharan Africa with prevalence increasing throughout childhood. Specific routes of transmission have not been clearly delineated, though HHV-8 is present in high concentrations in saliva. Methods: To understand the horizontal transmission of HHV-8 within households to children, we enrolled for cross-sectional analysis, 251 households including 254 children, age two and under, in Lusaka, Zambia. For all children, plasma was screened for HHV-8 and HIV type I (HIV-1) and health and behavioral questionnaires were completed. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess independent factors for HHV- 8 infection in children. Results: Risk factors for HHV-8 infection included increasing number of HHV-8-positive household members [OR 1/4 2.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.9-3.3; P < 0.01] and having a primary caregiver who tested the temperature of food with their tongue before feeding the child (OR1/4 2.4; 95% CI, 1.93-3.30; P1/4 0.01). Breastfeeding was protective against infection with HHV-8 for children (OR 1/4 0.3; 95% CI, 0.16-0.72; P < 0.01). Conclusions: These results indicate that exposure to HHV-8 in the household increases risk for early childhood infection, with specific feeding behaviors likely playing a role in transmission. Impact: Interventions to protect children from infection should emphasize the possibility of infection through sharing of foods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-308
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

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Human Herpesvirus 8
Infection
Herpesviridae Infections
Confidence Intervals
HIV-1
Zambia
Food
Africa South of the Sahara
Human Herpesvirus 1
Feeding Behavior
Breast Feeding
Saliva
Tongue
Caregivers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Medicine(all)

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Risk factors for early childhood infection of human herpesvirus-8 in zambian children : The role of early childhood feeding practices. / Crabtree, Kay L.; Wojcicki, Janet M.; Minhas, Veenu; Smith, David R.; Kankasa, Chipepo; Mitchell, Charles D; Wood, Charles.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.02.2014, p. 300-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crabtree, Kay L. ; Wojcicki, Janet M. ; Minhas, Veenu ; Smith, David R. ; Kankasa, Chipepo ; Mitchell, Charles D ; Wood, Charles. / Risk factors for early childhood infection of human herpesvirus-8 in zambian children : The role of early childhood feeding practices. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2014 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 300-308.
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