Review article: Hepatitis C virus infection and type-2 diabetes mellitus in renal diseases and transplantation

F. Fabrizi, P. Lampertico, G. Lunghi, S. Mangano, F. Aucella, Paul Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A link between hepatitis C virus infection and development of diabetes mellitus has been suggested by many investigators; however, this remains controversial. The mechanisms underlying the association between hepatitis C virus and diabetes mellitus are unclear but a great majority of clinical surveys have found a significant and independent relationship between hepatitis C virus and diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation arid orthotopic liver transplantation. We have systematically reviewed the scientific literature to explore the association between hepatitis C virus and diabetes mellitus in end-stage renal disease: in addition, data on patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation were also analysed. The unadjusted odds ratio for developing post-transplant diabetes mellitus in hepatitis C virus-infected renal transplant recipients ranged between 1.58 and 16.5 across the published studies. The rate of anti-hepatitis C virus antibody in serum was higher among dialysis patients having diabetes mellitus (odds ratio 9.9; 95% confidence interval 2.663-32.924). Patients with type-2 diabetes-related glomerulonephritis had the highest anti-hepatitis C virus prevalence [19.5% (24/123) vs. 3.2% (73/2247); P < 0.001] in a large cohort of Japanese patients who underwent renal biopsy. The link between hepatitis C virus and diabetes mellitus may explain, in part, the detrimental role of hepatitis C virus on patient and graft survival after orthotopic liver transplantation and/or renal transplantation. Preliminary evidence suggests that anti-viral therapies prior to renal transplantation and novel immunosuppressive regimens may lower the occurrence of diabetes mellitus in hepatitis C virus-infected patients after renal transplantation. Clinical trials are under way to assess if the hepatitis C virus-linked predisposition to new onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation may be reduced by newer immunosuppressive medications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)623-632
Number of pages10
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Virus Diseases
Hepacivirus
Kidney Transplantation
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus
Liver Transplantation
Immunosuppressive Agents
Odds Ratio
Literature
Kidney
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Graft Survival
Glomerulonephritis
Chronic Kidney Failure
Dialysis
Research Personnel
Clinical Trials
Confidence Intervals
Transplants
Biopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Review article : Hepatitis C virus infection and type-2 diabetes mellitus in renal diseases and transplantation. / Fabrizi, F.; Lampertico, P.; Lunghi, G.; Mangano, S.; Aucella, F.; Martin, Paul.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 21, No. 6, 15.03.2005, p. 623-632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fabrizi, F. ; Lampertico, P. ; Lunghi, G. ; Mangano, S. ; Aucella, F. ; Martin, Paul. / Review article : Hepatitis C virus infection and type-2 diabetes mellitus in renal diseases and transplantation. In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2005 ; Vol. 21, No. 6. pp. 623-632.
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