Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Assessment Using Scanning Laser Polarimetry

Harmohina Bagga, David Greenfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is mounting evidence that retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) loss precedes detectable visual field loss in early glaucomatous optic neuropathy. However, examination and photography of the RNFL is a difficult technique in many patients, is subjective, qualitative, variably reproducible, time consuming, operator dependent, and has limited sensitivity and specificity. Scanning laser polarimetry provides automated, objective, and quantitative measurements of the RNFL. Such assessments are highly reproducible and show good agreement with clinical estimates of optic nerve head structure and visual function. This report will review the historical development, technological principles, reproducibility, sensitivity and specificity, capacity to detect glaucomatous progression, strengths, and limitations of this technology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-42
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Ophthalmology Clinics
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004

Fingerprint

Scanning Laser Polarimetry
Nerve Fibers
Sensitivity and Specificity
Optic Nerve Diseases
Photography
Optic Disk
Visual Fields
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Assessment Using Scanning Laser Polarimetry. / Bagga, Harmohina; Greenfield, David.

In: International Ophthalmology Clinics, Vol. 44, No. 2, 01.03.2004, p. 29-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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