Retinal ganglion cell function in recovered optic neuritis: Faster is not better

Pedro Monsalve, Sandy Ren, Hong Jiang, Jianhua Wang, Maja Kostic, Philip Gordon, Vittorio Porciatti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To assess residual retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function in patients with recovered optic neuritis (ON) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Age-matched controls (C, n = 32) and MS patients (n = 17) with history of ON in one eye but normal visual acuity and color vision were tested with steady-state Pattern Electroretinogram (PERG). Light Emitting Diodes (LED)-generated bar gratings, robust signal averaging and Fourier analysis were used to assess response amplitude and latency. Results: PERG amplitude was similar for C, ON and fellow eyes (FE) (P = 0.4), but PERG latency was shortened in ON by 3.2 ms (P = 0.002) and in FE by 2.0 ms (P = 0.02) and was correlated (P < 0.01) with both Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) and Ganglion Cell Inner Plexiform Layer (GCIPL) thicknesses. PERG latency shortening could be simulated in control subjects (n = 8) by dioptrically blurring the edges of gratings (high spatial frequencies), which reduced activity of parvocellular RGCs with smaller/slower axons. The blurred PERG latency was shorter than baseline by 2.9 ms (P = 0.01). Conclusions: PERG latency is shortened in both eyes of MS patients with recovered unilateral ON, suggesting relative dysfunction of RGCs with slower axons and sparing of RGCs with faster axons. Significance: Assessment of PERG latency in MS and ON may help identifying and monitoring RGC dysfunction. PERG latency shortening in FE suggests primary retinopathy in MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1813-1818
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume129
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Fingerprint

Optic Neuritis
Retinal Ganglion Cells
Multiple Sclerosis
Axons
Neuritis
Color Vision
Fourier Analysis
Nerve Fibers
Ganglia
Visual Acuity
Reaction Time
Light

Keywords

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Optic neuritis
  • Pattern electroretinogram
  • Retinal ganglion cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sensory Systems
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Retinal ganglion cell function in recovered optic neuritis : Faster is not better. / Monsalve, Pedro; Ren, Sandy; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Jianhua; Kostic, Maja; Gordon, Philip; Porciatti, Vittorio.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 129, No. 9, 01.09.2018, p. 1813-1818.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Monsalve, Pedro ; Ren, Sandy ; Jiang, Hong ; Wang, Jianhua ; Kostic, Maja ; Gordon, Philip ; Porciatti, Vittorio. / Retinal ganglion cell function in recovered optic neuritis : Faster is not better. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2018 ; Vol. 129, No. 9. pp. 1813-1818.
@article{0616cb3cf04848a382bbde117e4eaa19,
title = "Retinal ganglion cell function in recovered optic neuritis: Faster is not better",
abstract = "Objective: To assess residual retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function in patients with recovered optic neuritis (ON) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Age-matched controls (C, n = 32) and MS patients (n = 17) with history of ON in one eye but normal visual acuity and color vision were tested with steady-state Pattern Electroretinogram (PERG). Light Emitting Diodes (LED)-generated bar gratings, robust signal averaging and Fourier analysis were used to assess response amplitude and latency. Results: PERG amplitude was similar for C, ON and fellow eyes (FE) (P = 0.4), but PERG latency was shortened in ON by 3.2 ms (P = 0.002) and in FE by 2.0 ms (P = 0.02) and was correlated (P < 0.01) with both Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) and Ganglion Cell Inner Plexiform Layer (GCIPL) thicknesses. PERG latency shortening could be simulated in control subjects (n = 8) by dioptrically blurring the edges of gratings (high spatial frequencies), which reduced activity of parvocellular RGCs with smaller/slower axons. The blurred PERG latency was shorter than baseline by 2.9 ms (P = 0.01). Conclusions: PERG latency is shortened in both eyes of MS patients with recovered unilateral ON, suggesting relative dysfunction of RGCs with slower axons and sparing of RGCs with faster axons. Significance: Assessment of PERG latency in MS and ON may help identifying and monitoring RGC dysfunction. PERG latency shortening in FE suggests primary retinopathy in MS.",
keywords = "Multiple sclerosis, Optic neuritis, Pattern electroretinogram, Retinal ganglion cells",
author = "Pedro Monsalve and Sandy Ren and Hong Jiang and Jianhua Wang and Maja Kostic and Philip Gordon and Vittorio Porciatti",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.clinph.2018.06.012",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "129",
pages = "1813--1818",
journal = "Clinical Neurophysiology",
issn = "1388-2457",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Retinal ganglion cell function in recovered optic neuritis

T2 - Faster is not better

AU - Monsalve, Pedro

AU - Ren, Sandy

AU - Jiang, Hong

AU - Wang, Jianhua

AU - Kostic, Maja

AU - Gordon, Philip

AU - Porciatti, Vittorio

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - Objective: To assess residual retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function in patients with recovered optic neuritis (ON) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Age-matched controls (C, n = 32) and MS patients (n = 17) with history of ON in one eye but normal visual acuity and color vision were tested with steady-state Pattern Electroretinogram (PERG). Light Emitting Diodes (LED)-generated bar gratings, robust signal averaging and Fourier analysis were used to assess response amplitude and latency. Results: PERG amplitude was similar for C, ON and fellow eyes (FE) (P = 0.4), but PERG latency was shortened in ON by 3.2 ms (P = 0.002) and in FE by 2.0 ms (P = 0.02) and was correlated (P < 0.01) with both Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) and Ganglion Cell Inner Plexiform Layer (GCIPL) thicknesses. PERG latency shortening could be simulated in control subjects (n = 8) by dioptrically blurring the edges of gratings (high spatial frequencies), which reduced activity of parvocellular RGCs with smaller/slower axons. The blurred PERG latency was shorter than baseline by 2.9 ms (P = 0.01). Conclusions: PERG latency is shortened in both eyes of MS patients with recovered unilateral ON, suggesting relative dysfunction of RGCs with slower axons and sparing of RGCs with faster axons. Significance: Assessment of PERG latency in MS and ON may help identifying and monitoring RGC dysfunction. PERG latency shortening in FE suggests primary retinopathy in MS.

AB - Objective: To assess residual retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function in patients with recovered optic neuritis (ON) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Age-matched controls (C, n = 32) and MS patients (n = 17) with history of ON in one eye but normal visual acuity and color vision were tested with steady-state Pattern Electroretinogram (PERG). Light Emitting Diodes (LED)-generated bar gratings, robust signal averaging and Fourier analysis were used to assess response amplitude and latency. Results: PERG amplitude was similar for C, ON and fellow eyes (FE) (P = 0.4), but PERG latency was shortened in ON by 3.2 ms (P = 0.002) and in FE by 2.0 ms (P = 0.02) and was correlated (P < 0.01) with both Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) and Ganglion Cell Inner Plexiform Layer (GCIPL) thicknesses. PERG latency shortening could be simulated in control subjects (n = 8) by dioptrically blurring the edges of gratings (high spatial frequencies), which reduced activity of parvocellular RGCs with smaller/slower axons. The blurred PERG latency was shorter than baseline by 2.9 ms (P = 0.01). Conclusions: PERG latency is shortened in both eyes of MS patients with recovered unilateral ON, suggesting relative dysfunction of RGCs with slower axons and sparing of RGCs with faster axons. Significance: Assessment of PERG latency in MS and ON may help identifying and monitoring RGC dysfunction. PERG latency shortening in FE suggests primary retinopathy in MS.

KW - Multiple sclerosis

KW - Optic neuritis

KW - Pattern electroretinogram

KW - Retinal ganglion cells

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049443911&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85049443911&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.clinph.2018.06.012

DO - 10.1016/j.clinph.2018.06.012

M3 - Article

C2 - 29981956

AN - SCOPUS:85049443911

VL - 129

SP - 1813

EP - 1818

JO - Clinical Neurophysiology

JF - Clinical Neurophysiology

SN - 1388-2457

IS - 9

ER -