Results of lower extremity amputations in patients with end-stage renal disease

Christos D. Dossa, Alexander D. Shepard, Aaron M. Amos, Warren Kupin, Daniel J. Reddy, Joseph P. Elliott, Judith M. Wilczewski, Calvin B. Ernst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on the outcome of patients undergoing lower extremity (LE) amputation. Methods: Hospital charts and vascular surgery registry data were reviewed for all patients who underwent LE amputation over a consecutive 56-month period. The results of 84 patients with ESRD (137 amputations) were compared with 375 patients (442 amputations) without ESRD. Results: Hospital mortality rate was significantly greater in patients with ESRD than patients without ESRD, 24% versus 7% (p = 0.001). Patients with ESRD undergoing minor amputations had mortality rates three times greater than patients without ESRD undergoing major LE amputations. In patients with ESRD requiring bilateral or unilateral above-knee amputation hospital mortality rates were 43% and 38%, respectively. In addition, patients with ESRD were seven times more likely to undergo bilateral amputation than patients without ESRD over a mean follow-up period of 17 months. No kidney transplant patients died after amputation. Conclusion: ESRD has a profound negative impact on morbidity, mortality, and survival rates after LE amputation. Attempts at prevention of amputation with aggressive foot care and patient education in this high-risk group should be the focus of therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-19
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Amputation
Chronic Kidney Failure
Lower Extremity
Mortality
Hospital Mortality
Patient Education
Blood Vessels
Registries
Foot
Knee
Survival Rate
Morbidity
Transplants
Kidney

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Dossa, C. D., Shepard, A. D., Amos, A. M., Kupin, W., Reddy, D. J., Elliott, J. P., ... Ernst, C. B. (1994). Results of lower extremity amputations in patients with end-stage renal disease. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 20(1), 14-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/0741-5214(94)90170-8

Results of lower extremity amputations in patients with end-stage renal disease. / Dossa, Christos D.; Shepard, Alexander D.; Amos, Aaron M.; Kupin, Warren; Reddy, Daniel J.; Elliott, Joseph P.; Wilczewski, Judith M.; Ernst, Calvin B.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.01.1994, p. 14-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dossa, CD, Shepard, AD, Amos, AM, Kupin, W, Reddy, DJ, Elliott, JP, Wilczewski, JM & Ernst, CB 1994, 'Results of lower extremity amputations in patients with end-stage renal disease', Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 14-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/0741-5214(94)90170-8
Dossa, Christos D. ; Shepard, Alexander D. ; Amos, Aaron M. ; Kupin, Warren ; Reddy, Daniel J. ; Elliott, Joseph P. ; Wilczewski, Judith M. ; Ernst, Calvin B. / Results of lower extremity amputations in patients with end-stage renal disease. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1994 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 14-19.
@article{f5643064f58e4f6d8d614f10171a1a32,
title = "Results of lower extremity amputations in patients with end-stage renal disease",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on the outcome of patients undergoing lower extremity (LE) amputation. Methods: Hospital charts and vascular surgery registry data were reviewed for all patients who underwent LE amputation over a consecutive 56-month period. The results of 84 patients with ESRD (137 amputations) were compared with 375 patients (442 amputations) without ESRD. Results: Hospital mortality rate was significantly greater in patients with ESRD than patients without ESRD, 24{\%} versus 7{\%} (p = 0.001). Patients with ESRD undergoing minor amputations had mortality rates three times greater than patients without ESRD undergoing major LE amputations. In patients with ESRD requiring bilateral or unilateral above-knee amputation hospital mortality rates were 43{\%} and 38{\%}, respectively. In addition, patients with ESRD were seven times more likely to undergo bilateral amputation than patients without ESRD over a mean follow-up period of 17 months. No kidney transplant patients died after amputation. Conclusion: ESRD has a profound negative impact on morbidity, mortality, and survival rates after LE amputation. Attempts at prevention of amputation with aggressive foot care and patient education in this high-risk group should be the focus of therapy.",
author = "Dossa, {Christos D.} and Shepard, {Alexander D.} and Amos, {Aaron M.} and Warren Kupin and Reddy, {Daniel J.} and Elliott, {Joseph P.} and Wilczewski, {Judith M.} and Ernst, {Calvin B.}",
year = "1994",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0741-5214(94)90170-8",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "14--19",
journal = "Journal of Vascular Surgery",
issn = "0741-5214",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Results of lower extremity amputations in patients with end-stage renal disease

AU - Dossa, Christos D.

AU - Shepard, Alexander D.

AU - Amos, Aaron M.

AU - Kupin, Warren

AU - Reddy, Daniel J.

AU - Elliott, Joseph P.

AU - Wilczewski, Judith M.

AU - Ernst, Calvin B.

PY - 1994/1/1

Y1 - 1994/1/1

N2 - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on the outcome of patients undergoing lower extremity (LE) amputation. Methods: Hospital charts and vascular surgery registry data were reviewed for all patients who underwent LE amputation over a consecutive 56-month period. The results of 84 patients with ESRD (137 amputations) were compared with 375 patients (442 amputations) without ESRD. Results: Hospital mortality rate was significantly greater in patients with ESRD than patients without ESRD, 24% versus 7% (p = 0.001). Patients with ESRD undergoing minor amputations had mortality rates three times greater than patients without ESRD undergoing major LE amputations. In patients with ESRD requiring bilateral or unilateral above-knee amputation hospital mortality rates were 43% and 38%, respectively. In addition, patients with ESRD were seven times more likely to undergo bilateral amputation than patients without ESRD over a mean follow-up period of 17 months. No kidney transplant patients died after amputation. Conclusion: ESRD has a profound negative impact on morbidity, mortality, and survival rates after LE amputation. Attempts at prevention of amputation with aggressive foot care and patient education in this high-risk group should be the focus of therapy.

AB - Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on the outcome of patients undergoing lower extremity (LE) amputation. Methods: Hospital charts and vascular surgery registry data were reviewed for all patients who underwent LE amputation over a consecutive 56-month period. The results of 84 patients with ESRD (137 amputations) were compared with 375 patients (442 amputations) without ESRD. Results: Hospital mortality rate was significantly greater in patients with ESRD than patients without ESRD, 24% versus 7% (p = 0.001). Patients with ESRD undergoing minor amputations had mortality rates three times greater than patients without ESRD undergoing major LE amputations. In patients with ESRD requiring bilateral or unilateral above-knee amputation hospital mortality rates were 43% and 38%, respectively. In addition, patients with ESRD were seven times more likely to undergo bilateral amputation than patients without ESRD over a mean follow-up period of 17 months. No kidney transplant patients died after amputation. Conclusion: ESRD has a profound negative impact on morbidity, mortality, and survival rates after LE amputation. Attempts at prevention of amputation with aggressive foot care and patient education in this high-risk group should be the focus of therapy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028071282&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028071282&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0741-5214(94)90170-8

DO - 10.1016/0741-5214(94)90170-8

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 14

EP - 19

JO - Journal of Vascular Surgery

JF - Journal of Vascular Surgery

SN - 0741-5214

IS - 1

ER -