Responsiveness to threats and incentives, expectancy of recurrence, and distress and disengagement: Moderator effects in women with early stage breast cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Models of neurobiological systems linking personality, motivation, and emotion can be integrated with the expectancy construct to suggest hypotheses about distress and giving up in response to adversity. In 220 women with breast cancer, threat responsiveness - sensitivity of the behavioral inhibition system (BIS) - and incentive responsiveness sensitivity of the behavioral activation system (BAS) - and expectancies about cancer recurrence were measured. It was predicted and found that high BIS sensitivity interacted with recurrence expectancy to predict elevated distress and disengagement. Low BAS sensitivity (reward responsiveness) also interacted with expectancy of recurrence to predict elevated disengagement. In contrast, high BAS sensitivity (fun seeking) interacted with recurrence expectancy to predict elevated distress. Discussion centers on theoretical implications and possible applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)965-975
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume68
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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