Response to six classes of antihypertensive medications by body mass index in a randomized controlled trial

Barry J. Materson, David W. Williams, Domenic J. Reda, William C. Cushman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Blood pressure increases with increasing body mass index (BMI) and BMI is linearly related to blood pressure in population studies. Obesity has been said to cause resistance to antihypertensive medications. We compared short-term and 1-year blood pressure response by BMI category and weight change with hydrochlorothiazide, atenolol, diltiazem-SR, captopril, clonidine, prazosin, or placebo in 1292 male veterans. Drug doses were titrated to achieve goal diastolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg over 4-8 weeks. Patients who achieved goal blood pressure were maintained for 1 year. BMI did not predict change in systolic, diastolic or pulse pressures during titration for any drug. At 1 year obese patients (BMI >30) were 2.5 times more likely to have diastolic blood pressure controlled by atenolol than normal weight (BMI <27) patients (p=0.01). Only prazosin patients gained weight: 1.7 lb (end-titration, p<0.0001; 1-year, p=0.02). Obesity does not appear to cause resistance to antihypertensive medications. (J Clin Hypertens. 2003;5:197-201)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-201
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Hypertension
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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