Response to second-line hormonal manipulation monitored by serum PSA in stage D2 prostate carcinoma

Haim Matzkin, Mark S. Soloway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) have been demonstrated to accurately assess response to initial hormone deprivation in metastatic prostate cancer patients. The role of PSA in monitoring response to second-line hormonal treatment has not been documented. In a group of 20 patients with an initial response to androgen deprivation and subsequent relapse we monitored PSA levels before and after second-line therapy. Ten patients had a clinical response. Four had a more than 90 percent decrease in serum PSA compared with the level at initial progression. This clinical response was maintained for a mean of eighteen months. Six patients had a PSA decrease less than 90 percent; their clinical response was of a mean 5.5 months. Ten patients had no change or increase in PSA. Seven had no clinical response, and 3 responded for an average of four months. Although production of PSA might be under endocrine control, changes in PSA are useful for monitoring response to second-line hormonal therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)78-80
Number of pages3
JournalUrology
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Prostate-Specific Antigen
Prostate
Carcinoma
Serum
Androgens
Prostatic Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Hormones
Recurrence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Response to second-line hormonal manipulation monitored by serum PSA in stage D2 prostate carcinoma. / Matzkin, Haim; Soloway, Mark S.

In: Urology, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.01.1992, p. 78-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Matzkin, Haim ; Soloway, Mark S. / Response to second-line hormonal manipulation monitored by serum PSA in stage D2 prostate carcinoma. In: Urology. 1992 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 78-80.
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