Reluctant referrals: The effectiveness of legal coercion in outpatient treatment for problem drinkers

Roger G Dunham, A. L. Mauss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A multivariate covariance model is used to compare the effectiveness of treatment for problem drinkers coerced into treatment by the courts and problem drinkers voluntarily initiating treatment, while statistically controlling for pretreatment group differences. With regards to effectiveness, and the role played by an element of coercion in effectiveness, type of referral did have an important independent impact upon treatment outcome. An element of coercion involved in that referral did not subvert the goals of the therapeutic model; indeed, it rendered successful treatment outcome considerably more likely than with strictly voluntary self-referral. Finally, coercion proved somewhat more effective where the penaltes for non-compliance compliance were the more certain, not necessarily the more severe.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-20
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Drug Issues
Volume12
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1982

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Coercion
outpatient treatment
Outpatients
Referral and Consultation
Compliance
Therapeutics
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Reluctant referrals : The effectiveness of legal coercion in outpatient treatment for problem drinkers. / Dunham, Roger G; Mauss, A. L.

In: Journal of Drug Issues, Vol. 12, No. 1, 1982, p. 5-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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