Releasing the regret lock

Consumer response to new alternatives after a Sale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research examines how consumers behave after they miss a sale and subsequently face a smaller sale for the same or different product. According to the proposed theory, a two-way interaction is predicted in which adding another similar alternative to the choice set leads to higher choice deferral without prior sale information but lower choice deferral with information about missing a larger sale on one of the alternatives. In addition, the new alternative in the choice set becomes more attractive and captures most of the market share. The results from three lab experiments and one field experiment confirm the hypotheses and the proposed mechanism. The article concludes with a discussion of the theoretical and managerial implications of the findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1039-1059
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Consumer Research
Volume35
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

Fingerprint

sale
experiment
market share
Consumer response
interaction
Choice sets
Experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

Cite this

Releasing the regret lock : Consumer response to new alternatives after a Sale. / Tsiros, Michael.

In: Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 35, No. 6, 04.2009, p. 1039-1059.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3fae9cfdcff041aea96136cfb8d1eafd,
title = "Releasing the regret lock: Consumer response to new alternatives after a Sale",
abstract = "This research examines how consumers behave after they miss a sale and subsequently face a smaller sale for the same or different product. According to the proposed theory, a two-way interaction is predicted in which adding another similar alternative to the choice set leads to higher choice deferral without prior sale information but lower choice deferral with information about missing a larger sale on one of the alternatives. In addition, the new alternative in the choice set becomes more attractive and captures most of the market share. The results from three lab experiments and one field experiment confirm the hypotheses and the proposed mechanism. The article concludes with a discussion of the theoretical and managerial implications of the findings.",
author = "Michael Tsiros",
year = "2009",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1086/593698",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "35",
pages = "1039--1059",
journal = "Journal of Consumer Research",
issn = "0093-5301",
publisher = "University of Chicago",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Releasing the regret lock

T2 - Consumer response to new alternatives after a Sale

AU - Tsiros, Michael

PY - 2009/4

Y1 - 2009/4

N2 - This research examines how consumers behave after they miss a sale and subsequently face a smaller sale for the same or different product. According to the proposed theory, a two-way interaction is predicted in which adding another similar alternative to the choice set leads to higher choice deferral without prior sale information but lower choice deferral with information about missing a larger sale on one of the alternatives. In addition, the new alternative in the choice set becomes more attractive and captures most of the market share. The results from three lab experiments and one field experiment confirm the hypotheses and the proposed mechanism. The article concludes with a discussion of the theoretical and managerial implications of the findings.

AB - This research examines how consumers behave after they miss a sale and subsequently face a smaller sale for the same or different product. According to the proposed theory, a two-way interaction is predicted in which adding another similar alternative to the choice set leads to higher choice deferral without prior sale information but lower choice deferral with information about missing a larger sale on one of the alternatives. In addition, the new alternative in the choice set becomes more attractive and captures most of the market share. The results from three lab experiments and one field experiment confirm the hypotheses and the proposed mechanism. The article concludes with a discussion of the theoretical and managerial implications of the findings.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67649227405&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67649227405&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/593698

DO - 10.1086/593698

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 1039

EP - 1059

JO - Journal of Consumer Research

JF - Journal of Consumer Research

SN - 0093-5301

IS - 6

ER -