Relationships between self-reported ankle function and modulation of Hoffmann reflex in patients with chronic ankle instability

Min Kim, Joseph M. Hart, Susan A. Saliba, Jay Hertel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine relationships between self-reported ankle function and Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation during changes in body positions in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Design: Observational. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Thirty-one young adults with CAI (19 males, 12 females) participated. Main outcome measures: There were two subscales of Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) to quantify self-reported ankle function during activities of daily living (ADL) and sports activities. Maximum H-reflexes (H-max) and motor waves (M-max) from soleus and fibularis longus were recorded while participants lied prone and stood in bipedal and unipedal stances. For each muscle, percent change scores in Hmax:Mmax ratios were calculated between each pair of positions: prone-to-bipedal, bipedal-to-unipedal, and prone-to-unipedal, and used as a measure of H-reflex modulation. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between FAAM and H-reflex modulation measures. Results: There were significant correlations between: (1) FAAM-ADL and soleus prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.384, p = 0.04), (2) FAAM-Sport and soleus prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.505, p = 0.005), (3) FAAM-Sport and fibular bipedal-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.377, p = 0.05), and (4) FAAM-Sport and fibular prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.396, p = 0.04). Conclusions: CAI patients presented moderate, positive relationships between self-reported ankle function and H-reflex modulation during changes in body positions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-68
Number of pages6
JournalPhysical Therapy in Sport
Volume17
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Ankle
Reflex
Aptitude
H-Reflex
Foot
Sports
Activities of Daily Living
Prone Position
Young Adult
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Muscles

Keywords

  • Ankle dysfunction
  • Fibularis longus
  • Soleus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Relationships between self-reported ankle function and modulation of Hoffmann reflex in patients with chronic ankle instability. / Kim, Min; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Hertel, Jay.

In: Physical Therapy in Sport, Vol. 17, 01.01.2016, p. 63-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e35b5da6f9cf4a2d8ee7678def19f493,
title = "Relationships between self-reported ankle function and modulation of Hoffmann reflex in patients with chronic ankle instability",
abstract = "Objective: To examine relationships between self-reported ankle function and Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation during changes in body positions in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Design: Observational. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Thirty-one young adults with CAI (19 males, 12 females) participated. Main outcome measures: There were two subscales of Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) to quantify self-reported ankle function during activities of daily living (ADL) and sports activities. Maximum H-reflexes (H-max) and motor waves (M-max) from soleus and fibularis longus were recorded while participants lied prone and stood in bipedal and unipedal stances. For each muscle, percent change scores in Hmax:Mmax ratios were calculated between each pair of positions: prone-to-bipedal, bipedal-to-unipedal, and prone-to-unipedal, and used as a measure of H-reflex modulation. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between FAAM and H-reflex modulation measures. Results: There were significant correlations between: (1) FAAM-ADL and soleus prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.384, p = 0.04), (2) FAAM-Sport and soleus prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.505, p = 0.005), (3) FAAM-Sport and fibular bipedal-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.377, p = 0.05), and (4) FAAM-Sport and fibular prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.396, p = 0.04). Conclusions: CAI patients presented moderate, positive relationships between self-reported ankle function and H-reflex modulation during changes in body positions.",
keywords = "Ankle dysfunction, Fibularis longus, Soleus",
author = "Min Kim and Hart, {Joseph M.} and Saliba, {Susan A.} and Jay Hertel",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ptsp.2015.05.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "63--68",
journal = "Physical Therapy in Sport",
issn = "1873-1600",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationships between self-reported ankle function and modulation of Hoffmann reflex in patients with chronic ankle instability

AU - Kim, Min

AU - Hart, Joseph M.

AU - Saliba, Susan A.

AU - Hertel, Jay

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Objective: To examine relationships between self-reported ankle function and Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation during changes in body positions in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Design: Observational. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Thirty-one young adults with CAI (19 males, 12 females) participated. Main outcome measures: There were two subscales of Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) to quantify self-reported ankle function during activities of daily living (ADL) and sports activities. Maximum H-reflexes (H-max) and motor waves (M-max) from soleus and fibularis longus were recorded while participants lied prone and stood in bipedal and unipedal stances. For each muscle, percent change scores in Hmax:Mmax ratios were calculated between each pair of positions: prone-to-bipedal, bipedal-to-unipedal, and prone-to-unipedal, and used as a measure of H-reflex modulation. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between FAAM and H-reflex modulation measures. Results: There were significant correlations between: (1) FAAM-ADL and soleus prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.384, p = 0.04), (2) FAAM-Sport and soleus prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.505, p = 0.005), (3) FAAM-Sport and fibular bipedal-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.377, p = 0.05), and (4) FAAM-Sport and fibular prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.396, p = 0.04). Conclusions: CAI patients presented moderate, positive relationships between self-reported ankle function and H-reflex modulation during changes in body positions.

AB - Objective: To examine relationships between self-reported ankle function and Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation during changes in body positions in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Design: Observational. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Thirty-one young adults with CAI (19 males, 12 females) participated. Main outcome measures: There were two subscales of Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) to quantify self-reported ankle function during activities of daily living (ADL) and sports activities. Maximum H-reflexes (H-max) and motor waves (M-max) from soleus and fibularis longus were recorded while participants lied prone and stood in bipedal and unipedal stances. For each muscle, percent change scores in Hmax:Mmax ratios were calculated between each pair of positions: prone-to-bipedal, bipedal-to-unipedal, and prone-to-unipedal, and used as a measure of H-reflex modulation. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between FAAM and H-reflex modulation measures. Results: There were significant correlations between: (1) FAAM-ADL and soleus prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.384, p = 0.04), (2) FAAM-Sport and soleus prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.505, p = 0.005), (3) FAAM-Sport and fibular bipedal-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.377, p = 0.05), and (4) FAAM-Sport and fibular prone-to-unipedal modulation (r = 0.396, p = 0.04). Conclusions: CAI patients presented moderate, positive relationships between self-reported ankle function and H-reflex modulation during changes in body positions.

KW - Ankle dysfunction

KW - Fibularis longus

KW - Soleus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84949634405&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84949634405&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ptsp.2015.05.003

DO - 10.1016/j.ptsp.2015.05.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 26541975

AN - SCOPUS:84949634405

VL - 17

SP - 63

EP - 68

JO - Physical Therapy in Sport

JF - Physical Therapy in Sport

SN - 1873-1600

ER -