Relationships among measures of retail salesperson performance

Michael Levy, Arun Sharma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A lack of understanding of the relationships among measures of salesperson performance exists in practice and in the retailing/sales management literature. This article examines the relationships among three commonly used measures—one outcome (sales volume) and two judgmental measures (managerial evaluations and salesperson self-evaluations). We empirically demonstrate that not all judgmental measures are related to outcome measures; that is, salesperson self-evaluations are significantly related to sales volume, but managerial evaluations are not. The study also examines the efficacy of retailers using short outcome-measuring periods for evaluation purposes. The results suggest that outcome measure variance within salespeople for short periods is high and therefore these data should be used with caution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-238
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Academy of Marketing Science: Official Publication of the Academy of Marketing Science
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Fingerprint

Evaluation
Retail
Salesperson performance
Salesperson
Efficacy
Retailers
Retailing
Salespeople
Sales management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

Cite this

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