Relationship of tumor angiogenesis and nuclear p53 accumulation in invasive bladder cancer

Bernard H. Bochner, David Esrig, Susan Groshen, Ming Dickinson, Noel Weidner, Peter W. Nichols, Donald G. Skinner, Richard J Cote

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the relationship between tumor angiogenesis and nuclear p53 accumulation in invasive bladder cancer. We studied 161 patients with invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder who had previously undergone radical cystectomy. Analysis was performed to determine the presence of p53 nuclear accumulation and extent of tumor-associated angiogenesis p53 status identified a group of patients at high risk for tumor progression (p53-altered tumors), and microvessel density determinations added additional prognostic information by identifying a subset of aggressive tumors within the wild-type p53 subgroup. At 5 years, patients with tumors exhibiting no evidence of p53 alterations and low microvessel counts demonstrated 3% recurrence and 88% survival, compared to 43% recurrence and 59% overall survival for patients with intermediate vessel counts and 61% recurrence and 43% overall survival for patients with the highest vessel counts (P < 0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively). Angiogenesis also provides additional prognostic information to patients with tumors that demonstrate p53 alterations. An association between angiogenesis and p53 status did exist (P = 0.05); however, 27% of the tumors that showed no evidence of p53 alterations exhibited high microvessel counts, and 26% of tumors with evidence of p53 alterations had low microvessel counts. Tumor-associated angiogenesis adds additional useful prognostic information to that which is obtained from p53 status in patients with invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Although an association between p53 status and the degree of angiogenesis was identified, other factors appear to play a role in the regulation of tumor- induced neovasularization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1615-1622
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Cancer Research
Volume3
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Microvessels
Transitional Cell Carcinoma
Recurrence
Survival
Urinary Bladder
Cystectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Bochner, B. H., Esrig, D., Groshen, S., Dickinson, M., Weidner, N., Nichols, P. W., ... Cote, R. J. (1997). Relationship of tumor angiogenesis and nuclear p53 accumulation in invasive bladder cancer. Clinical Cancer Research, 3(9), 1615-1622.

Relationship of tumor angiogenesis and nuclear p53 accumulation in invasive bladder cancer. / Bochner, Bernard H.; Esrig, David; Groshen, Susan; Dickinson, Ming; Weidner, Noel; Nichols, Peter W.; Skinner, Donald G.; Cote, Richard J.

In: Clinical Cancer Research, Vol. 3, No. 9, 01.09.1997, p. 1615-1622.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bochner, BH, Esrig, D, Groshen, S, Dickinson, M, Weidner, N, Nichols, PW, Skinner, DG & Cote, RJ 1997, 'Relationship of tumor angiogenesis and nuclear p53 accumulation in invasive bladder cancer', Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 3, no. 9, pp. 1615-1622.
Bochner BH, Esrig D, Groshen S, Dickinson M, Weidner N, Nichols PW et al. Relationship of tumor angiogenesis and nuclear p53 accumulation in invasive bladder cancer. Clinical Cancer Research. 1997 Sep 1;3(9):1615-1622.
Bochner, Bernard H. ; Esrig, David ; Groshen, Susan ; Dickinson, Ming ; Weidner, Noel ; Nichols, Peter W. ; Skinner, Donald G. ; Cote, Richard J. / Relationship of tumor angiogenesis and nuclear p53 accumulation in invasive bladder cancer. In: Clinical Cancer Research. 1997 ; Vol. 3, No. 9. pp. 1615-1622.
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