Relations between experimentally induced tooth pain threshold changes, psychometrics and clinical pain relief following TENS. A retrospective study in patients with long-lasting pain

E. G. Widerström, P. G. Åslund, L. E. Gustafsson, C. Mannheimer, S. G. Carlsson, S. A. Andersson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Summary The present study investigates the relationships between clinical pain relief, physiological and psychological parameters. Out of 50 patients with long-lasting musculoskeletal neck- and shoulder-pain treated with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), 21 were selected and classified as responders (n = 13) or non-responders (n = 8). Tooth pain thresholds (PT) were measured before and after an experimental TENS treatment and the relative change in PT following the stimulation was calculated. Three psychometric self-inventories were administered: Zung Depression Scale, Spielberger's Trait Anxiety Scale and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale. Responders (R) and non-responders (NR) differed significantly from each other in the PT measurements as well as on the psychometric scales. NR exhibited higher levels of anxiety and depression, a more pronounced powerful other orientation and no change or a decrease in PT following TENS compared to R. These findings indicate relationships and interactions between physiological and psychological factors in patients with long-lasting pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-287
Number of pages7
JournalPain
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1992
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Experimental pain
  • Pain relief
  • Psychometric measures
  • TENS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neurology
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Psychology

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