Relation of hostility to medication adherence, symptom complaints, and blood pressure reduction in a clinical field trial of antihypertensive medication

David Lee, Carlos F. Mendes de Leon, C. David Jenkins, Sydney H. Croog, Sol Levine, Abraham Sudilovsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The impact of hostility was examined in relation to the conduct and results of a clinical field trial. Data were derived from a multi-center randomized double-blind study of the comparative effects of antihypertensive therapy (captopril, methyldopa and propranolol) on the quality of life of 620 hypertensive men. Hostility levels were higher in subjects reporting skipping medication dosages compared to those reporting they always complied with the medication schedule. Reporting of symptoms often associated with antihypertensive drug regimens was positively related to hostility scores throughout the study, even during the blinded placebo period. Persons with high hostility scores showed the greatest decline in blood pressure independent of type of antihypertensive medication. However, there was some limited evidence that hostility levels were significantly reduced by one antihypertensive medication. Overall, the present findings suggest that double-blind pharmacologic clinical trials may benefit from using reliable measures of hostility as covariates in the evaluation of symptom reports and amount of blood pressure reduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-190
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Relation of hostility to medication adherence, symptom complaints, and blood pressure reduction in a clinical field trial of antihypertensive medication'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this