Regret: A model of its antecedents and consequences in consumer decision making

Michael Tsiros, Vikas Mittal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

306 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The article develops a model of regret and tests it via four studies. Study 1 develops a multi-item measure of regret and distinguishes it from satisfaction. It also shows that, while satisfaction directly influences both repurchase and complaint intertions, regret directly influences only repurchase intentions, and its effect on complaint intentions is fully mediated via satisfaction. Study 2 examines the antecedents and moderators of regret. It shows that regret is experienced even in the absence of information on a better-forgone outcome. Furthermore, the moderating effect of three situation-specific characteristics (outcome valence, status quo preservation, and reversibility of the outcome) is examined. Studies 3 and 4 examine the cognitive process underlying the experiencing of regret in the absence of information on a better-forgone outcome. Generation of counterfactuals is identified as the cognitive mechanism that engenders regret. Results show that counterfactuals are most likely to be generated when the chosen outcome is negative and not the status quo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-417
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Consumer Research
Volume26
Issue number4
StatePublished - Mar 2000

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decision making
complaint
moderator
Consumer decision making
Decision Making
Complaints
Status quo
Intentions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Marketing
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Regret : A model of its antecedents and consequences in consumer decision making. / Tsiros, Michael; Mittal, Vikas.

In: Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 26, No. 4, 03.2000, p. 401-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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