Regional blood flow in compression-induced brain edema in rats

Effect of dietary vitamin E

R. Busto, S. Yoshida, Myron Ginsberg, O. Alonso, D. W. Smith, W. J. Goldberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied autoradiographically in a murine model of focal epidural brain compression, and the effect of vitamin E administration was investigated. Mean cortical CBF was reduced to 0.48 to 0.50 ml/gm/min following 2 or 24 hours of compression. Early (2 hours) following subsequent decompression, a mixed pattern of hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion was observed. Twenty-four hours later, rCBF heterogeneities were less marked. Comparisons among animal groups raised on vitamin E-supplemented, vitamin E-normal, and vitamin E-deficient diets 2 hours after decompression revealed marked reductions in rCBF in the previously compressed cortex of the last two groups and hyperemia of the underlying hippocampus. The vitamin E-supplemented rats showed increased flow in the previously compressed cortex. In addition, vitamin E supplementation tended to eliminate rCBF gradients between subjacent zones. These data may help explain our previous observations of the beneficial effects of vitamin E on compression-induced brain edema.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)441-448
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume15
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jul 5 1984

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Cerebrovascular Circulation
Brain Edema
Regional Blood Flow
Vitamin E
Tocopherols
Decompression
Hyperemia
Hippocampus
Diet
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Busto, R., Yoshida, S., Ginsberg, M., Alonso, O., Smith, D. W., & Goldberg, W. J. (1984). Regional blood flow in compression-induced brain edema in rats: Effect of dietary vitamin E. Annals of Neurology, 15(5), 441-448.

Regional blood flow in compression-induced brain edema in rats : Effect of dietary vitamin E. / Busto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Ginsberg, Myron; Alonso, O.; Smith, D. W.; Goldberg, W. J.

In: Annals of Neurology, Vol. 15, No. 5, 05.07.1984, p. 441-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Busto, R, Yoshida, S, Ginsberg, M, Alonso, O, Smith, DW & Goldberg, WJ 1984, 'Regional blood flow in compression-induced brain edema in rats: Effect of dietary vitamin E', Annals of Neurology, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 441-448.
Busto R, Yoshida S, Ginsberg M, Alonso O, Smith DW, Goldberg WJ. Regional blood flow in compression-induced brain edema in rats: Effect of dietary vitamin E. Annals of Neurology. 1984 Jul 5;15(5):441-448.
Busto, R. ; Yoshida, S. ; Ginsberg, Myron ; Alonso, O. ; Smith, D. W. ; Goldberg, W. J. / Regional blood flow in compression-induced brain edema in rats : Effect of dietary vitamin E. In: Annals of Neurology. 1984 ; Vol. 15, No. 5. pp. 441-448.
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