Regenerative proliferation in inner ear sensory epithelia from adult guinea pigs and humans

Mark E. Warchol, Paul R. Lambert, Bradley J Goldstein, Andrew Forge, Jeffrey T. Corwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

376 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Supporting cells in the vestibular sensory epithelia from the ears of mature guinea pigs and adult humans proliferate in vitro after treatments with aminoglycoside antibiotics that cause sensory hair cells to die. After 4 weeks in culture, the epithelia contained new cells with some characteristics of immature hair cells. These findings are in contrast to expectations based on previous studies, which had suggested that hair cell loss is irreversible in mammals. The loss of hair cells is responsible for hearing and balance deficits that affect millions of people.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1619-1622
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume259
Issue number5101
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Inner Ear
Guinea Pigs
Epithelium
Alopecia
Aminoglycosides
Hearing
Ear
Mammals
Anti-Bacterial Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Warchol, M. E., Lambert, P. R., Goldstein, B. J., Forge, A., & Corwin, J. T. (1993). Regenerative proliferation in inner ear sensory epithelia from adult guinea pigs and humans. Science, 259(5101), 1619-1622.

Regenerative proliferation in inner ear sensory epithelia from adult guinea pigs and humans. / Warchol, Mark E.; Lambert, Paul R.; Goldstein, Bradley J; Forge, Andrew; Corwin, Jeffrey T.

In: Science, Vol. 259, No. 5101, 01.01.1993, p. 1619-1622.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Warchol, ME, Lambert, PR, Goldstein, BJ, Forge, A & Corwin, JT 1993, 'Regenerative proliferation in inner ear sensory epithelia from adult guinea pigs and humans', Science, vol. 259, no. 5101, pp. 1619-1622.
Warchol ME, Lambert PR, Goldstein BJ, Forge A, Corwin JT. Regenerative proliferation in inner ear sensory epithelia from adult guinea pigs and humans. Science. 1993 Jan 1;259(5101):1619-1622.
Warchol, Mark E. ; Lambert, Paul R. ; Goldstein, Bradley J ; Forge, Andrew ; Corwin, Jeffrey T. / Regenerative proliferation in inner ear sensory epithelia from adult guinea pigs and humans. In: Science. 1993 ; Vol. 259, No. 5101. pp. 1619-1622.
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