Regeneration of a Tooth in a Tissue-Engineered Mandible After Resection of a Central Giant Cell Tumor. Demonstrating Evidence of Functional Matrix Theory and Ectodermal Origin of Teeth in a Human Model—A Case Report

James C. Melville, Marcus A. Couey, Matthew S. Tong, Robert Marx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Central giant cell tumors (CGCTs) are uncommon lesions occurring in the jaw. They are benign but locally destructive osteolytic lesions. They usually occur in pediatric patients 5 to 15 years of age. Multiple noninvasive modalities of treatment (intralesional steroids, interferon, calcitonin, and denosumab) have been described for those lesions, but for those that are refractory to treatment, enucleation and curettage or resection is a curative surgery. This case report describes a pediatric patient who was diagnosed with an aggressive CGCT of the left mandible encompassing the right angle to the condyle. The lesion became refractory to noninvasive treatments and immediate resection and reconstruction was performed using principles of tissue engineering. After 5 years of close observation, the patient showed normal morphology and growth of his mandible, but surprisingly developed a left mandibular third molar (tooth 17) in the site of the mandibular resection and reconstruction. This is the first case report in the literature to show the spontaneous development of teeth in a human reconstructed mandible, contributing evidence toward the functional matrix theory of mandibular growth and ectodermal origin of teeth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)850-857
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume75
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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