Refraction and shoaling of surface waves by currents and topography as observed by HF radars

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Phased-array Doppler radars were deployed immediately south of the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay during the COPE-3 experiment in the fall of 1997. The radars collected the Doppler spectra and extracted surface current vectors for a period of 45 days. Significant wave height and peak period estimates were obtained from the Doppler spectra using the method originally developed by Barrick (1977). The study region was strongly impacted by the outflow from the Chesapeake Bay. The buoyant plume that emanated from the bay during ebb tides was observed in the surface current maps produced by the HF radars. Significant surface current shear existed at the boundary where the buoyant plume overrode denser shelf water, resulting in a convergence frontal zone. The refraction and shoaling of the surface waves was observed as they propagated over these regions. The current-induced shoaling of incident waves was isolated from the effects of local topography. The location of significant wave height growth and dissipation was found to be dependent upon the tidal stage and the wind and wave direction. Regional remote sensing of both waves and currents was necessary to identify these high energy regions which are of considerable interest for studies of mixing at the estuarine front as well as for the safe maritime operations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IEEE Working Conference on Current Measurement
EditorsJ.A. Rizoli
Pages115-118
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 2003
EventProceedings of the IEEE Seventh Working Conference on Current Measurement; Current and Wave Monitoring and Emerging Technologies - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Mar 13 2003Mar 15 2003

Other

OtherProceedings of the IEEE Seventh Working Conference on Current Measurement; Current and Wave Monitoring and Emerging Technologies
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period3/13/033/15/03

Fingerprint

Refraction
Surface waves
Topography
surface waves
refraction
topography
Chesapeake Bay (US)
plumes
wind direction
vector currents
mouth
Induced currents
Tides
phased arrays
tides
shelves
remote sensing
Remote sensing
dissipation
shear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Haus, B. K., Graber, H. C., & Ramos, R. (2003). Refraction and shoaling of surface waves by currents and topography as observed by HF radars. In J. A. Rizoli (Ed.), Proceedings of the IEEE Working Conference on Current Measurement (pp. 115-118)

Refraction and shoaling of surface waves by currents and topography as observed by HF radars. / Haus, Brian K; Graber, Hans C; Ramos, Rafael.

Proceedings of the IEEE Working Conference on Current Measurement. ed. / J.A. Rizoli. 2003. p. 115-118.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Haus, BK, Graber, HC & Ramos, R 2003, Refraction and shoaling of surface waves by currents and topography as observed by HF radars. in JA Rizoli (ed.), Proceedings of the IEEE Working Conference on Current Measurement. pp. 115-118, Proceedings of the IEEE Seventh Working Conference on Current Measurement; Current and Wave Monitoring and Emerging Technologies, San Diego, CA, United States, 3/13/03.
Haus BK, Graber HC, Ramos R. Refraction and shoaling of surface waves by currents and topography as observed by HF radars. In Rizoli JA, editor, Proceedings of the IEEE Working Conference on Current Measurement. 2003. p. 115-118
Haus, Brian K ; Graber, Hans C ; Ramos, Rafael. / Refraction and shoaling of surface waves by currents and topography as observed by HF radars. Proceedings of the IEEE Working Conference on Current Measurement. editor / J.A. Rizoli. 2003. pp. 115-118
@inproceedings{1616cf21a9e54a24ae83d050e7a22eda,
title = "Refraction and shoaling of surface waves by currents and topography as observed by HF radars",
abstract = "Phased-array Doppler radars were deployed immediately south of the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay during the COPE-3 experiment in the fall of 1997. The radars collected the Doppler spectra and extracted surface current vectors for a period of 45 days. Significant wave height and peak period estimates were obtained from the Doppler spectra using the method originally developed by Barrick (1977). The study region was strongly impacted by the outflow from the Chesapeake Bay. The buoyant plume that emanated from the bay during ebb tides was observed in the surface current maps produced by the HF radars. Significant surface current shear existed at the boundary where the buoyant plume overrode denser shelf water, resulting in a convergence frontal zone. The refraction and shoaling of the surface waves was observed as they propagated over these regions. The current-induced shoaling of incident waves was isolated from the effects of local topography. The location of significant wave height growth and dissipation was found to be dependent upon the tidal stage and the wind and wave direction. Regional remote sensing of both waves and currents was necessary to identify these high energy regions which are of considerable interest for studies of mixing at the estuarine front as well as for the safe maritime operations.",
author = "Haus, {Brian K} and Graber, {Hans C} and Rafael Ramos",
year = "2003",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "115--118",
editor = "J.A. Rizoli",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the IEEE Working Conference on Current Measurement",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Refraction and shoaling of surface waves by currents and topography as observed by HF radars

AU - Haus, Brian K

AU - Graber, Hans C

AU - Ramos, Rafael

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - Phased-array Doppler radars were deployed immediately south of the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay during the COPE-3 experiment in the fall of 1997. The radars collected the Doppler spectra and extracted surface current vectors for a period of 45 days. Significant wave height and peak period estimates were obtained from the Doppler spectra using the method originally developed by Barrick (1977). The study region was strongly impacted by the outflow from the Chesapeake Bay. The buoyant plume that emanated from the bay during ebb tides was observed in the surface current maps produced by the HF radars. Significant surface current shear existed at the boundary where the buoyant plume overrode denser shelf water, resulting in a convergence frontal zone. The refraction and shoaling of the surface waves was observed as they propagated over these regions. The current-induced shoaling of incident waves was isolated from the effects of local topography. The location of significant wave height growth and dissipation was found to be dependent upon the tidal stage and the wind and wave direction. Regional remote sensing of both waves and currents was necessary to identify these high energy regions which are of considerable interest for studies of mixing at the estuarine front as well as for the safe maritime operations.

AB - Phased-array Doppler radars were deployed immediately south of the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay during the COPE-3 experiment in the fall of 1997. The radars collected the Doppler spectra and extracted surface current vectors for a period of 45 days. Significant wave height and peak period estimates were obtained from the Doppler spectra using the method originally developed by Barrick (1977). The study region was strongly impacted by the outflow from the Chesapeake Bay. The buoyant plume that emanated from the bay during ebb tides was observed in the surface current maps produced by the HF radars. Significant surface current shear existed at the boundary where the buoyant plume overrode denser shelf water, resulting in a convergence frontal zone. The refraction and shoaling of the surface waves was observed as they propagated over these regions. The current-induced shoaling of incident waves was isolated from the effects of local topography. The location of significant wave height growth and dissipation was found to be dependent upon the tidal stage and the wind and wave direction. Regional remote sensing of both waves and currents was necessary to identify these high energy regions which are of considerable interest for studies of mixing at the estuarine front as well as for the safe maritime operations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037275112&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037275112&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 115

EP - 118

BT - Proceedings of the IEEE Working Conference on Current Measurement

A2 - Rizoli, J.A.

ER -