Reduction of cancer-specific thought intrusions and anxiety symptoms with a stress management intervention among women undergoing treatment for breast cancer

Michael H Antoni, Sarah R. Wimberly, Suzanne C Lechner, Aisha Kazi, Tammy Sifre, Kenya R. Urcuyo, Kristin Phillips, Roselyn G. Smith, Vida M. Petronis, Sophie Guellati, Kurrie A. Wells, Bonnie B Blomberg, Charles S Carver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

132 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: After surgery for breast cancer, many women experience anxiety relating to the cancer that can adversely affect quality of life and emotional functioning during the year postsurgery. Symptoms such as intrusive thoughts may be ameliorated during this period with a structured, group-based cognitive behavior intervention. Method: A 10-week group cognitive behavior stress management intervention that included anxiety reduction (relaxation training), cognitive restructuring, and coping skills training was tested among 199 women newly treated for stage 0-III breast cancer. They were then followed for 1 year after recruitment. Results: The intervention reduced reports of thought intrusion, interviewer ratings of anxiety, and emotional distress across 1 year significantly more than was seen with the control condition. The beneficial effects were maintained well past the completion of adjuvant therapy. Conclusions: Structured, group-based cognitive behavior stress management may ameliorate cancer-related anxiety during active medical treatment for breast cancer and for 1 year following treatment. Group-based cognitive behavior stress management is a clinically useful adjunct to offer to women treated for breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1791-1797
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume163
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

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Anxiety
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
antineoplaston A10
Psychological Adaptation
Therapeutics
Quality of Life
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Reduction of cancer-specific thought intrusions and anxiety symptoms with a stress management intervention among women undergoing treatment for breast cancer. / Antoni, Michael H; Wimberly, Sarah R.; Lechner, Suzanne C; Kazi, Aisha; Sifre, Tammy; Urcuyo, Kenya R.; Phillips, Kristin; Smith, Roselyn G.; Petronis, Vida M.; Guellati, Sophie; Wells, Kurrie A.; Blomberg, Bonnie B; Carver, Charles S.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 163, No. 10, 01.10.2006, p. 1791-1797.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Antoni, Michael H ; Wimberly, Sarah R. ; Lechner, Suzanne C ; Kazi, Aisha ; Sifre, Tammy ; Urcuyo, Kenya R. ; Phillips, Kristin ; Smith, Roselyn G. ; Petronis, Vida M. ; Guellati, Sophie ; Wells, Kurrie A. ; Blomberg, Bonnie B ; Carver, Charles S. / Reduction of cancer-specific thought intrusions and anxiety symptoms with a stress management intervention among women undergoing treatment for breast cancer. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 2006 ; Vol. 163, No. 10. pp. 1791-1797.
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