Reducing racial/ethnic tobacco cessation disparities via cognitive behavioral therapy: Design of a dualsite randomized controlled trial

Monica W Hooper, David J Lee, Vani N. Simmons, Karen O. Brandon, Michael H Antoni, Marina Unrod, Taghrid Asfar, John B. Correa, Tulay Sengul, Thomas H. Brandon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco cessation are such that U.S. minorities have greater difficulty quitting compared to White non-Hispanics. Group differences in distress (i.e., perceived stress and depressive symptoms) may contribute to cessation disparities. The allostasis model of health suggests that the toll of chronic stress experienced by racial/ethnic minorities may lead to dysregulation of the physiological stress system and drug use. Previous research suggests that group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for tobacco cessation addresses distress as a modifiable mechanism and has the potential to reduce/eliminate disparities. The present study is a dualsite randomized controlled trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of group CBT in eliminating racial/ethnic differences in smoking cessation and distress. The study utilizes a [2 (intervention: group CBT or group general health education [GHE]) × 3 (race/ethnicity: African American/Black, Hispanic, White)] factorial design by randomizing 225 adult smokers from the community. Both interventions provide eight counseling sessions and eight weeks of nicotine patch therapy. Assessments occur at the end-of-therapy, and at 3-, 6-, and 12-months. Generalized longitudinal mixed modeling will be used to test our primary abstinence outcome, biochemically-confirmed 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 12-months. We hypothesize that group CBT will reduce or eliminate racial/ethnic differences in perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and smoking cessation compared to group GHE. We also hypothesize that reductions in physiological distress, assessed by salivary cortisol, will mediate racial/ethnic group differences in smoking cessation, particularly among racial/ethnic minorities. This study has implications for eliminating disparities in psychosocial factors related to tobacco use and cessation. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.govNCT02511236. Registered on July 27, 2015.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-132
Number of pages6
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume68
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use Cessation
Cognitive Therapy
Smoking Cessation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Health Education
Allostasis
Depression
Tobacco Use Cessation Products
Physiological Stress
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
African Americans
Hydrocortisone
Counseling
Psychology
Health
Therapeutics
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Disparities
  • Distress
  • Smoking cessation
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Reducing racial/ethnic tobacco cessation disparities via cognitive behavioral therapy : Design of a dualsite randomized controlled trial. / Hooper, Monica W; Lee, David J; Simmons, Vani N.; Brandon, Karen O.; Antoni, Michael H; Unrod, Marina; Asfar, Taghrid; Correa, John B.; Sengul, Tulay; Brandon, Thomas H.

In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, Vol. 68, 01.05.2018, p. 127-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hooper, Monica W ; Lee, David J ; Simmons, Vani N. ; Brandon, Karen O. ; Antoni, Michael H ; Unrod, Marina ; Asfar, Taghrid ; Correa, John B. ; Sengul, Tulay ; Brandon, Thomas H. / Reducing racial/ethnic tobacco cessation disparities via cognitive behavioral therapy : Design of a dualsite randomized controlled trial. In: Contemporary Clinical Trials. 2018 ; Vol. 68. pp. 127-132.
@article{fd62efec07be46f1af166210a26a2051,
title = "Reducing racial/ethnic tobacco cessation disparities via cognitive behavioral therapy: Design of a dualsite randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco cessation are such that U.S. minorities have greater difficulty quitting compared to White non-Hispanics. Group differences in distress (i.e., perceived stress and depressive symptoms) may contribute to cessation disparities. The allostasis model of health suggests that the toll of chronic stress experienced by racial/ethnic minorities may lead to dysregulation of the physiological stress system and drug use. Previous research suggests that group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for tobacco cessation addresses distress as a modifiable mechanism and has the potential to reduce/eliminate disparities. The present study is a dualsite randomized controlled trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of group CBT in eliminating racial/ethnic differences in smoking cessation and distress. The study utilizes a [2 (intervention: group CBT or group general health education [GHE]) × 3 (race/ethnicity: African American/Black, Hispanic, White)] factorial design by randomizing 225 adult smokers from the community. Both interventions provide eight counseling sessions and eight weeks of nicotine patch therapy. Assessments occur at the end-of-therapy, and at 3-, 6-, and 12-months. Generalized longitudinal mixed modeling will be used to test our primary abstinence outcome, biochemically-confirmed 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 12-months. We hypothesize that group CBT will reduce or eliminate racial/ethnic differences in perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and smoking cessation compared to group GHE. We also hypothesize that reductions in physiological distress, assessed by salivary cortisol, will mediate racial/ethnic group differences in smoking cessation, particularly among racial/ethnic minorities. This study has implications for eliminating disparities in psychosocial factors related to tobacco use and cessation. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.govNCT02511236. Registered on July 27, 2015.",
keywords = "Cognitive behavioral therapy, Depressive symptoms, Disparities, Distress, Smoking cessation, Stress",
author = "Hooper, {Monica W} and Lee, {David J} and Simmons, {Vani N.} and Brandon, {Karen O.} and Antoni, {Michael H} and Marina Unrod and Taghrid Asfar and Correa, {John B.} and Tulay Sengul and Brandon, {Thomas H.}",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.cct.2018.03.017",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "68",
pages = "127--132",
journal = "Contemporary Clinical Trials",
issn = "1551-7144",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reducing racial/ethnic tobacco cessation disparities via cognitive behavioral therapy

T2 - Design of a dualsite randomized controlled trial

AU - Hooper, Monica W

AU - Lee, David J

AU - Simmons, Vani N.

AU - Brandon, Karen O.

AU - Antoni, Michael H

AU - Unrod, Marina

AU - Asfar, Taghrid

AU - Correa, John B.

AU - Sengul, Tulay

AU - Brandon, Thomas H.

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco cessation are such that U.S. minorities have greater difficulty quitting compared to White non-Hispanics. Group differences in distress (i.e., perceived stress and depressive symptoms) may contribute to cessation disparities. The allostasis model of health suggests that the toll of chronic stress experienced by racial/ethnic minorities may lead to dysregulation of the physiological stress system and drug use. Previous research suggests that group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for tobacco cessation addresses distress as a modifiable mechanism and has the potential to reduce/eliminate disparities. The present study is a dualsite randomized controlled trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of group CBT in eliminating racial/ethnic differences in smoking cessation and distress. The study utilizes a [2 (intervention: group CBT or group general health education [GHE]) × 3 (race/ethnicity: African American/Black, Hispanic, White)] factorial design by randomizing 225 adult smokers from the community. Both interventions provide eight counseling sessions and eight weeks of nicotine patch therapy. Assessments occur at the end-of-therapy, and at 3-, 6-, and 12-months. Generalized longitudinal mixed modeling will be used to test our primary abstinence outcome, biochemically-confirmed 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 12-months. We hypothesize that group CBT will reduce or eliminate racial/ethnic differences in perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and smoking cessation compared to group GHE. We also hypothesize that reductions in physiological distress, assessed by salivary cortisol, will mediate racial/ethnic group differences in smoking cessation, particularly among racial/ethnic minorities. This study has implications for eliminating disparities in psychosocial factors related to tobacco use and cessation. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.govNCT02511236. Registered on July 27, 2015.

AB - Racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco cessation are such that U.S. minorities have greater difficulty quitting compared to White non-Hispanics. Group differences in distress (i.e., perceived stress and depressive symptoms) may contribute to cessation disparities. The allostasis model of health suggests that the toll of chronic stress experienced by racial/ethnic minorities may lead to dysregulation of the physiological stress system and drug use. Previous research suggests that group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for tobacco cessation addresses distress as a modifiable mechanism and has the potential to reduce/eliminate disparities. The present study is a dualsite randomized controlled trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of group CBT in eliminating racial/ethnic differences in smoking cessation and distress. The study utilizes a [2 (intervention: group CBT or group general health education [GHE]) × 3 (race/ethnicity: African American/Black, Hispanic, White)] factorial design by randomizing 225 adult smokers from the community. Both interventions provide eight counseling sessions and eight weeks of nicotine patch therapy. Assessments occur at the end-of-therapy, and at 3-, 6-, and 12-months. Generalized longitudinal mixed modeling will be used to test our primary abstinence outcome, biochemically-confirmed 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 12-months. We hypothesize that group CBT will reduce or eliminate racial/ethnic differences in perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and smoking cessation compared to group GHE. We also hypothesize that reductions in physiological distress, assessed by salivary cortisol, will mediate racial/ethnic group differences in smoking cessation, particularly among racial/ethnic minorities. This study has implications for eliminating disparities in psychosocial factors related to tobacco use and cessation. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.govNCT02511236. Registered on July 27, 2015.

KW - Cognitive behavioral therapy

KW - Depressive symptoms

KW - Disparities

KW - Distress

KW - Smoking cessation

KW - Stress

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044928407&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85044928407&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cct.2018.03.017

DO - 10.1016/j.cct.2018.03.017

M3 - Article

C2 - 29617633

AN - SCOPUS:85044928407

VL - 68

SP - 127

EP - 132

JO - Contemporary Clinical Trials

JF - Contemporary Clinical Trials

SN - 1551-7144

ER -