Reducing excessive questions in adults at adult-day training centers using differential-reinforcement-of-low rates

Pablo A. Otalvaro, Christopher A. Krebs, Adam T. Brewer, Yanerys Leon, Jason S. Steifman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Differential-reinforcement-of-low rate (DRL) schedules are often used to reduce, not eliminate, behavior. We systematically replicated Austin and Bevan (2011) to determine whether the number of questions asked by two adults with intellectual disabilities working at adult-day-training centers could be reduced using a full-session DRL. The full-session DRL involved delivery of a reinforcer at the end of the day if the number of questions asked was less than a specified number during the entire session. Questions, up to a specified number, were also reinforced within-session. The full-session DRL reduced the number of questions asked by both participants and increased duration of task engagement for one participant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)545-553
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of applied behavior analysis
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adult-day-training center
  • adults
  • differential-reinforcement-of-low rate
  • intellectual disabilities
  • question asking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Applied Psychology

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