Recurrent hematomas following craniotomy for traumatic intracranial mass

Ross Bullock, C. O. Hannemann, L. Murray, G. M. Teasdale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Of 850 patients who underwent craniotomy for evacuation of a traumatic intracranial mass, 59 (6.9%) developed a second hematoma at the operation site, which required a second operation. Compared to those who did not, patients who developed postcraniotomy hematoma (PCH) had a significantly higher incidence of evidence of alcohol intake and preoperative mannitol administration; a higher percentage had a bad outcome. Coagulopathy was frequent in PCH patients. Although three-quarters of the initial hematomas were intradural, 69% of the PCH's were predominantly extradural. The large potential space underlying a craniotomy bone flap may predispose to development of a PCH. Intracranial pressure (ICP) was monitored in 39 of the 59 PCH patients, which allowed earlier detection of the PCH in 22 (56%). In 17 patients, the ICP failed to rise despite clinical deterioration, and detection of the PCH was delayed, significantly worsening the outcome in this group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-14
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume72
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Craniotomy
Hematoma
Intracranial Pressure
Mannitol
Alcohols
Bone and Bones
Incidence

Keywords

  • Head injury
  • intracranial hematoma
  • outcome
  • postcraniotomy hematoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Bullock, R., Hannemann, C. O., Murray, L., & Teasdale, G. M. (1990). Recurrent hematomas following craniotomy for traumatic intracranial mass. Journal of Neurosurgery, 72(1), 9-14.

Recurrent hematomas following craniotomy for traumatic intracranial mass. / Bullock, Ross; Hannemann, C. O.; Murray, L.; Teasdale, G. M.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 72, No. 1, 01.01.1990, p. 9-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bullock, R, Hannemann, CO, Murray, L & Teasdale, GM 1990, 'Recurrent hematomas following craniotomy for traumatic intracranial mass', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 72, no. 1, pp. 9-14.
Bullock R, Hannemann CO, Murray L, Teasdale GM. Recurrent hematomas following craniotomy for traumatic intracranial mass. Journal of Neurosurgery. 1990 Jan 1;72(1):9-14.
Bullock, Ross ; Hannemann, C. O. ; Murray, L. ; Teasdale, G. M. / Recurrent hematomas following craniotomy for traumatic intracranial mass. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1990 ; Vol. 72, No. 1. pp. 9-14.
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