Reconceiving Military Base Redevelopment: Land Use on Mothballed U.S. Bases

Amanda Johnson Ashley, Michael Touchton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Defense has closed 128 domestic bases over the last 30 years through the Base Realignment and Closure Process. Current scholarship describes this process and provides snapshots of transition, yet there is very little systematic knowledge of what follows base closure. We introduce an original data set chronicling military base redevelopment and present evidence suggesting that the variation in the built environment on former military bases stems from considerations somewhat unique to military redevelopment, particularly the presence of federal funding, contamination of redevelopment parcels, and economic output in the surrounding county. Our arguments offer new directions for redevelopment scholarship and a first step for developing best practices to help cities redevelop mothballed bases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-420
Number of pages30
JournalUrban Affairs Review
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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redevelopment
land use
Military
environmental pollution
best practice
funding
present
economics
evidence

Keywords

  • base closures
  • defense conversion
  • land use
  • military base redevelopment
  • urban revitalization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Reconceiving Military Base Redevelopment : Land Use on Mothballed U.S. Bases. / Ashley, Amanda Johnson; Touchton, Michael.

In: Urban Affairs Review, Vol. 52, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 391-420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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