Recombinant human erythropoietin and renal anemia: Molecular biology, clinical efficacy, and nervous system effects

Allen R. Nissenson, Stephen D Nimer, Deane L. Wolcott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anemia (hematocrit < 25%) predictably accompanies chronic renal failure and is present in over 90% of patients on chronic dialysis. Relative erythropoietin deficiency is the proximate cause. Recombinant human erythropoietin recently became available for research and clinical use. Erythropoietin production is regulated by a single copy gene located on chromosome 7; its expression has been shown in the kidney, liver, and macrophages. It is a glycosylated protein of 166 amino acids with a molecular weight of 34 000 D. When given to patients with the anemia of renal failure, erythropoietin causes a dose-dependent rise in hematocrit to the normal range within 8 to 14 weeks. Complications of this response are minimal except for a significant incidence of hypertension. When the anemia is corrected, the patient's quality of life, cognitive function, and brain electrophysiology improve dramatically. Recombinant human erythropoietin represents a major breakthrough in the treatment of patients with chronic renal failure. Current reimbursement constraints limit its full application.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)402-416
Number of pages15
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume114
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Erythropoietin
Nervous System
Anemia
Molecular Biology
Kidney
Hematocrit
Chronic Kidney Failure
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7
Electrophysiology
Cognition
Renal Insufficiency
Dialysis
Reference Values
Molecular Weight
Macrophages
Quality of Life
Hypertension
Amino Acids
Liver
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Recombinant human erythropoietin and renal anemia : Molecular biology, clinical efficacy, and nervous system effects. / Nissenson, Allen R.; Nimer, Stephen D; Wolcott, Deane L.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 114, No. 5, 01.03.1991, p. 402-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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