Recombinant adenovirus coexpressing covalent peptide/MHC class II complex and B7-1

In vitro and in vivo activation of myelin basic protein-specific T cells

J. Chen, B. T. Huber, R. J. Grand, Wei Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated that an MHC class II molecule with an antigenic peptide genetically fused to its β-chain is capable of presenting this peptide to CD4+ T cells. We hypothesized that covalent peptide/class II complex may direct the accessory molecules to exert their function specifically onto T cells in a TCR-guided fashion. To test this hypothesis, we generated several recombinant adenoviruses expressing covalent myelin basic protein peptide/I-Au complex (MBP1-11/I-Au) and the costimulatory molecule B7-1. Functional studies demonstrated that adenovirus-infected cells are capable of activating an MBP1-11-specific T cell hybridoma. Coexpression of the B7-1 molecule and MBP1-11/I-Au by the same adenovirus leads to synergy in T cell activation elicited by virus-infected cells. Furthermore, studies in syngeneic mice infected with the various adenoviruses revealed that MBP1-11-specific T cells are specifically activated by the coexpression of B7-1 and MBP1-11/I-Au in vivo. In conclusion, the coexpression of the covalent peptide/class II complex and accessory molecules by the same adenovirus provides a unique strategy to modulate the epitope-specific T cell response in a TCR-guided fashion. This approach may be applicable to investigate the roles of other accessory molecules in the engagement of the TCR class II molecule by substituting B7-1 with other accessory molecules in the recombinant adenovirus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1297-1305
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume167
Issue number3
StatePublished - Aug 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Myelin Basic Protein
Adenoviridae
T-Lymphocytes
Peptides
B7 Antigens
CD80 Antigens
Virus Activation
T-Lymphocyte Epitopes
Hybridomas
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Recombinant adenovirus coexpressing covalent peptide/MHC class II complex and B7-1 : In vitro and in vivo activation of myelin basic protein-specific T cells. / Chen, J.; Huber, B. T.; Grand, R. J.; Li, Wei.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 167, No. 3, 01.08.2001, p. 1297-1305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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