Recognition of "real-world" musical excerpts by cochlear implant recipients and normal-hearing adults

Kate Gfeller, Carol Olszewski, Marly Rychener, Kimberly Sena Moore, John F. Knutson, Shelley Witt, Beth Macpherson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purposes of this study were (a) to compare recognition of "real-world" music excerpts by postlingually deafened adults using cochlear implants and normal-hearing adults; (b) to compare the performance of cochlear implant recipients using different devices and processing strategies; and (c) to examine the variability among implant recipients in recognition of musical selections in relation to performance on speech perception tests, performance on cognitive tests, and demographic variables. Design: Seventy-nine cochlear implant users and 30 normal-hearing adults were tested on open-set recognition of systematically selected excerpts from musical recordings heard in real life. The recognition accuracy of the two groups was compared for three musical genre: classical, country, and pop. Recognition accuracy was correlated with speech recognition scores, cognitive measures, and demographic measures, including musical background. Results: Cochlear implant recipients were significantly less accurate in recognition of previously familiar (known before hearing loss) musical excerpts than normal-hearing adults (p <0.001) for all three genre. Implant recipients were most accurate in the recognition of country items and least accurate in the recognition of classical items. There were no significant differences among implant recipients due to implant type (Nucleus, Clarion, or Ineraid), or programming strategy (SPEAK, CIS, or ACE). For cochlear implant recipients, correlations between melody recognition and other measures were moderate to weak in strength; those with statistically significant correlations included age at time of testing (negatively correlated), performance on selected speech perception tests, and the amount of focused music listening following implantation. Conclusions: Current-day cochlear implants are not effective in transmitting several key structural features (i.e., pitch, harmony, timbral blends) of music essential to open-set recognition of well-known musical selections. Consequently, implant recipients must rely on extracting those musical features most accessible through the implant, such as song lyrics or a characteristic rhythm pattern, to identify the sorts of musical selections heard in everyday life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-250
Number of pages14
JournalEar and Hearing
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cochlear Implants
Hearing
Music
Speech Perception
Recognition (Psychology)
Demography
Hearing Loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Recognition of "real-world" musical excerpts by cochlear implant recipients and normal-hearing adults. / Gfeller, Kate; Olszewski, Carol; Rychener, Marly; Sena Moore, Kimberly; Knutson, John F.; Witt, Shelley; Macpherson, Beth.

In: Ear and Hearing, Vol. 26, No. 3, 06.2005, p. 237-250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gfeller, Kate ; Olszewski, Carol ; Rychener, Marly ; Sena Moore, Kimberly ; Knutson, John F. ; Witt, Shelley ; Macpherson, Beth. / Recognition of "real-world" musical excerpts by cochlear implant recipients and normal-hearing adults. In: Ear and Hearing. 2005 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 237-250.
@article{a14ca2e960494fb88ac338e60dd9483d,
title = "Recognition of {"}real-world{"} musical excerpts by cochlear implant recipients and normal-hearing adults",
abstract = "Objective: The purposes of this study were (a) to compare recognition of {"}real-world{"} music excerpts by postlingually deafened adults using cochlear implants and normal-hearing adults; (b) to compare the performance of cochlear implant recipients using different devices and processing strategies; and (c) to examine the variability among implant recipients in recognition of musical selections in relation to performance on speech perception tests, performance on cognitive tests, and demographic variables. Design: Seventy-nine cochlear implant users and 30 normal-hearing adults were tested on open-set recognition of systematically selected excerpts from musical recordings heard in real life. The recognition accuracy of the two groups was compared for three musical genre: classical, country, and pop. Recognition accuracy was correlated with speech recognition scores, cognitive measures, and demographic measures, including musical background. Results: Cochlear implant recipients were significantly less accurate in recognition of previously familiar (known before hearing loss) musical excerpts than normal-hearing adults (p <0.001) for all three genre. Implant recipients were most accurate in the recognition of country items and least accurate in the recognition of classical items. There were no significant differences among implant recipients due to implant type (Nucleus, Clarion, or Ineraid), or programming strategy (SPEAK, CIS, or ACE). For cochlear implant recipients, correlations between melody recognition and other measures were moderate to weak in strength; those with statistically significant correlations included age at time of testing (negatively correlated), performance on selected speech perception tests, and the amount of focused music listening following implantation. Conclusions: Current-day cochlear implants are not effective in transmitting several key structural features (i.e., pitch, harmony, timbral blends) of music essential to open-set recognition of well-known musical selections. Consequently, implant recipients must rely on extracting those musical features most accessible through the implant, such as song lyrics or a characteristic rhythm pattern, to identify the sorts of musical selections heard in everyday life.",
author = "Kate Gfeller and Carol Olszewski and Marly Rychener and {Sena Moore}, Kimberly and Knutson, {John F.} and Shelley Witt and Beth Macpherson",
year = "2005",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1097/00003446-200506000-00001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "237--250",
journal = "Ear and Hearing",
issn = "0196-0202",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Recognition of "real-world" musical excerpts by cochlear implant recipients and normal-hearing adults

AU - Gfeller, Kate

AU - Olszewski, Carol

AU - Rychener, Marly

AU - Sena Moore, Kimberly

AU - Knutson, John F.

AU - Witt, Shelley

AU - Macpherson, Beth

PY - 2005/6

Y1 - 2005/6

N2 - Objective: The purposes of this study were (a) to compare recognition of "real-world" music excerpts by postlingually deafened adults using cochlear implants and normal-hearing adults; (b) to compare the performance of cochlear implant recipients using different devices and processing strategies; and (c) to examine the variability among implant recipients in recognition of musical selections in relation to performance on speech perception tests, performance on cognitive tests, and demographic variables. Design: Seventy-nine cochlear implant users and 30 normal-hearing adults were tested on open-set recognition of systematically selected excerpts from musical recordings heard in real life. The recognition accuracy of the two groups was compared for three musical genre: classical, country, and pop. Recognition accuracy was correlated with speech recognition scores, cognitive measures, and demographic measures, including musical background. Results: Cochlear implant recipients were significantly less accurate in recognition of previously familiar (known before hearing loss) musical excerpts than normal-hearing adults (p <0.001) for all three genre. Implant recipients were most accurate in the recognition of country items and least accurate in the recognition of classical items. There were no significant differences among implant recipients due to implant type (Nucleus, Clarion, or Ineraid), or programming strategy (SPEAK, CIS, or ACE). For cochlear implant recipients, correlations between melody recognition and other measures were moderate to weak in strength; those with statistically significant correlations included age at time of testing (negatively correlated), performance on selected speech perception tests, and the amount of focused music listening following implantation. Conclusions: Current-day cochlear implants are not effective in transmitting several key structural features (i.e., pitch, harmony, timbral blends) of music essential to open-set recognition of well-known musical selections. Consequently, implant recipients must rely on extracting those musical features most accessible through the implant, such as song lyrics or a characteristic rhythm pattern, to identify the sorts of musical selections heard in everyday life.

AB - Objective: The purposes of this study were (a) to compare recognition of "real-world" music excerpts by postlingually deafened adults using cochlear implants and normal-hearing adults; (b) to compare the performance of cochlear implant recipients using different devices and processing strategies; and (c) to examine the variability among implant recipients in recognition of musical selections in relation to performance on speech perception tests, performance on cognitive tests, and demographic variables. Design: Seventy-nine cochlear implant users and 30 normal-hearing adults were tested on open-set recognition of systematically selected excerpts from musical recordings heard in real life. The recognition accuracy of the two groups was compared for three musical genre: classical, country, and pop. Recognition accuracy was correlated with speech recognition scores, cognitive measures, and demographic measures, including musical background. Results: Cochlear implant recipients were significantly less accurate in recognition of previously familiar (known before hearing loss) musical excerpts than normal-hearing adults (p <0.001) for all three genre. Implant recipients were most accurate in the recognition of country items and least accurate in the recognition of classical items. There were no significant differences among implant recipients due to implant type (Nucleus, Clarion, or Ineraid), or programming strategy (SPEAK, CIS, or ACE). For cochlear implant recipients, correlations between melody recognition and other measures were moderate to weak in strength; those with statistically significant correlations included age at time of testing (negatively correlated), performance on selected speech perception tests, and the amount of focused music listening following implantation. Conclusions: Current-day cochlear implants are not effective in transmitting several key structural features (i.e., pitch, harmony, timbral blends) of music essential to open-set recognition of well-known musical selections. Consequently, implant recipients must rely on extracting those musical features most accessible through the implant, such as song lyrics or a characteristic rhythm pattern, to identify the sorts of musical selections heard in everyday life.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=21444451437&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=21444451437&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00003446-200506000-00001

DO - 10.1097/00003446-200506000-00001

M3 - Article

C2 - 15937406

AN - SCOPUS:21444451437

VL - 26

SP - 237

EP - 250

JO - Ear and Hearing

JF - Ear and Hearing

SN - 0196-0202

IS - 3

ER -